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Features / Case Studies (Stories from around the wildlife film-making world!) Home

Wildscreen Festival 2020

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See previous feature pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 and check out our 'interviews' pages too!

Wildlife Winners and Losers - Brock Initiative

Wild Pages: The Wildlife Film-makers' Resource Guide

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Botswana 2020 Behind-the-scenes with Robert Hofmeyr and his Mum!

In February 2020 we travelled overland to the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, Makgadikgadi and Nxai Pan National Parks in Botswana to film the desert wildlife of the Kalahari and the zebra migration during the rainy season. In this short film, I hope to show you a bit about what goes into filming high resolution content in the remote African wilderness. This is my first behind-the-scenes video, so please let us know in the comments if you would like me to make more of this kind of content.

The adventure starts in Hermanus, near the Southern tip of Africa. Since my usual assistant was unable to come on this trip, my mother kindly offered to join and help with the driving. We travelled via the Karoo into Botswana and on to the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. In the CKGR we camped for 3 nights in Deception Valley filming desert wildlife, birds, lions and cheetahs. Then we travelled West to Tau Pan Camp where we spent most of our time on the pan itself, filming the herds of wildebeest, gemsbok (oryx) and springbok, as well as a beautiful male lion, a cheetah, a giraffe, bat-eared foxes, and black-backed jackals. After a few nights at Tau Pan, we moved East again to Leopard Pan, where we camped for a 3 more nights. From Leopard Pan, they visited the small copse of trees where Mark and Delia Owens camped in the 1970s. They later wrote the book 'Cry of the Kalahari' about this experience.

After more sightings of lions and other Kalahari birds and animals, we headed out of the park. In part 2 of this series we visit Boteti River Camp, near the gate of the Makgadikgadi Pans National Park as well as South Camp in Nxai Pan National Park.


Botswana 2020 Behind-the-scenes (Part 1 of 2) - Central Kalahari Game Reserve.

After ten days in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, we left the park and travelled to Boteti River Camp, near the gate of the Makgadikgadi Pans National Park. Here we spent some time exploring the mostly dry riverbed, and filming elephants, giraffe, fish eagles, hippos, lilac-breasted rollers, and other beautiful species that frequent this ares.

We then travelled through the park, intending to camp at the remote Tree Island campsite, but since the zebra migration had not yet arrived in the area, we decided to keep moving and camp at South Camp in the Nxai Pan National Park. In Nxai Pan, we were happy to find the large herds of zebra we had been looking for.

In this film, I also do a walk around of my filming vehicle, and share some tips for remote cinematography and camping in African wildlife areas. Filmed on Red Weapon Magnesium, GoPro Hero 8, DJI Mavic Pro, and Samsung Gear 360.


Botswana 2020 Behind-the-scenes (Part 2 of 2) - Makgadikgadi and Nxai Pan National Parks.

Visit: www.movingpictures.africa

Snake

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Wildscreen Festival Announces 2020 Panda Award Nominees
By Wildscreen
23rd July 2020

Wildscreen, the not-for-profit behind the world’s biggest festival of natural history storytelling, today announced the nominees for the 2020 Wildscreen Panda Awards – the highest honour in the international wildlife film and TV content industry.

Wildlife documentary thriller SEA OF SHADOWS, from National Geographic Documentary Films leads the way, picking up four nominations out of the nine film categories for Editing, Music, Producer/Director and Sound.

The adrenaline-packed documentary follows a team of dedicated scientists, high-tech conservationists, investigative journalists and courageous undercover agents as well as the Mexican Navy as they put their lives on the line to save the last of the world’s 30 remaining vaquitas and bring a vicious international crime syndicate to justice.

Silverback Films tops the list as the most nominated production company, securing five nods, including best Scripted Narrative for the soon to released, the 93-year-old broadcaster’s witness statement on the state of the Earth and his vision for the future.

BBC Studios Natural History Unit follows close behind with four nominations, dominating the Series category with DYNASTIES and SEVEN WORLDS, ONE PLANET.

Films creating impact beyond entertainment stood out for the jury, with SEA OF SHADOWS being joined by STROOP (Producer Director), PENG YU SAI (Emerging Talent) and OUR PLANET (Cinematography) in the nominations.

This was also evident in the Photo Story Award nominees, Brent Stirton’s PANGOLIN IN CRISIS, Joan de la Malla’s MASKED MONKEYS and Audun Rickardsen’s DINNER IS SERVED - all of which shine a light on contemporary conservation issues.

Jeff Wilson, Chair of the Panda Awards Nomination Jury said: “This year was a bumper year for the Wildscreen Panda Awards, with our 30 nominees standing out amongst nearly 600 entries from over 30 countries. However what was remarkable to me was that, despite COVID19 preventing our international jury of over 30 world-leading broadcasters, producers and craft professional being in the same room as one another, the discussions were as intense, as intelligent and as mind-opening as any jury debates that have gone before.

Across all categories and juries, a clear message from within the industry emerged – at a time when the natural world and the human race are under pressure from global events, our films and teams need to have purpose beyond entertainment. Consistently the Jury’s voted for the films that not only had a creative voice but also that left an indelible impact on audiences. The overwhelming consensus was now, more than ever, our films have to stand above the parapets and be part of the global conversation on the future of our planet.”

Alongside the craft awards, Wildscreen also introduced two new categories this year, recognising the talent of individuals and teams, with best Producer/Director and Production Team.

The 2020 line-up also welcomes productions not pure in their natural history form, including Passion Pictures’ H2O – THE MOLECULE THAT MADE US, securing two nomination for Series and Scripted Narrative and CLOROFILIA, nominated for its fresh fiction-fusion approach and sense of humour from Argentinian production company, PLANTA ALTA, nominated for Emerging Talent.

Category sponsors are: Doclights/NDR Naturfilm Producer/Director Panda Award, Dolby Cinematography Panda Award, Dolby Sound Panda Award, Icon Films Emerging Talent Panda Award, and the NHK Scripted Narrative Panda Award.

The winners will be announced on 22 October at the Panda Awards Celebration, during the first ever virtual edition of the Wildscreen Festival. Wildscreen announced back in May that it would taking the industry-leading event online, seizing the opportunity to make it the most inclusive and accessible Festival in its 38-year history.

Three-month industry passes are on sale now at £125, with concessions offered at £50. Tickets can be purchased here.


And the Panda Awards nominees are...

Wildscreen Panda Awards 2020 Nominations List:

DOLBY CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD

My Octopus Teacher
Sea Change Project and Off the Fence; A Netflix Original Production
Underwater photography by: Roger Horrocks, Craig Foster
Aerials: Tom Foster
Topside photography: Warren Smart
Additional photography: Pippa Ehrlich, Dave Aenmae
South Africa

Dynasties: Chimpanzee
BBC Studios NHU, BBC America, Tencent, France Télévisions and CCTV9
Photography by: John Brown, Mark MacEwen
United Kingdom

Our Planet: One Planet
Silverback Films with WWF for Netflix
Photography by Jamie McPherson, Roger Horrocks, John Aitchison, Paul Stewart, Gavin Thurston, Warwick Sloss, Mateo Willis, Sophie Darlington, Matt Aeberhard
United Kingdom


EDITING AWARD

Sea of Shadows
Terra Mater Factual Studios in association with Appian Way, Malaika Pictures, The Wild Lens Collective for National Geographic Documentary Films
Editors: Georg Michael Fischer & Verena Schönauer
Austria

Wild Cuba: A Caribbean Journey
Crossing the Line Productions for ORF, BBC, RTÉ, France Télévisions, WNET Thirteen, PBS, ORF Enterprises
Editor: Jamie Fitzpatrick
Ireland

Disneynature Penguins
Silverback Films
for Disneynature
Editor: Andy Netley
United Kingdom


ICON FILMS EMERGING TALENT AWARD

Andrés Sehinkman, Jonathan Barg, Leandro Vital, Armin Marchesini Weihmuller and Ailín Salas
For the film Clorofilia Planta Alta
Argentina

George Pretty
For the film Life on the Rocks
The National Film & Television School
United Kingdom

Malaika Vaz and Nitye Sood
For the film Peng Yu Sai
Untamed Planet
India

MUSIC AWARD

Sea of Shadows
Terra Mater Factual Studios in association with Appian Way, Malaika Pictures, The Wild Lens Collective for National Geographic Documentary Films
Music by: H. Scott Salinas
Austria

Disneynature Penguins
Silverback Films
for Disneynature
Music by: Harry Gregson-Williams
United Kingdom

Dancing with the Birds
Silverback Films
for Netflix
Music by: David Mitcham
United Kingdom

PHOTO STORY AWARD

Pangolins in Crisis
Brent Stirton
South Africa

Masked Monkeys
Joan de la Malla
Spain

Dinner is served
Audun Rikardsen
Norway

PRODUCTION TEAM AWARD

Earth from Space: A New Perspective
BBC Studios Natural History Unit, PBS and The Open University
United Kingdom

Lost Kings of Bioko
GULO Film Productions and Doclights GmbH / NDR Naturfilm for NDR, WDR, ARTE, ORF, SVT, Smithsonian Channel
Germany

Night on Earth: Dusk till Dawn
Plimsoll Productions for Netflix
United Kingdom

DOCLIGHTS / NDR NATURFILM PRODUCER DIRECTOR AWARD

Richard Ladkani, Walter Köhler and Wolfgang Knöpfler
For the film Sea of Shadows
Terra Mater Factual Studios in association with Appian Way, Malaika Pictures, The Wild Lens Collective for National Geographic Documentary Films
Austria

Craig Foster, Pippa Ehrlich and James Reed
For the film My Octopus Teacher
Sea Change Project and Off the Fence; A Netflix Original Production
South Africa

Bonné de Bod and Susan Scott
For the film STROOP – Journey into the Rhino Horn War
SDBFilms
South Africa

NHK SCRIPTED NARRATIVE AWARD

H20: The Molecule That Made Us
Passion Planet Ltd and WGBH Boston for PBS
Script by: Nicolas Brown, Alex Tate
United Kingdom

Savage Kingdom
Icon Films in association with Natural History Film Unit Botswana for National Geographic
Script by: Andy Mitchell
United Kingdom

David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet
Silverback Films and WWF for Netflix
Script by: David Attenborough with Jonnie Hughes
United Kingdom

SERIES AWARD

Dynasties
BBC Studios NHU, BBC America, Tencent, France Télévisions and CCTV9
United Kingdom

Seven Worlds, One Planet
BBC Studios Natural History Unit, BBC America, France Televisions, ZDF, Tencent Penguin Pictures and China Media Group CCTV9
United Kingdom

H2O: The Molecule that Made Us
Passion Planet Ltd and WGBH Boston for PBS
United Kingdom

DOLBY SOUND AWARD

Sea of Shadows
Terra Mater Factual Studios in association with Appian Way, Malaika Pictures, The Wild Lens Collective for National Geographic Documentary Films
Sound by: Bernhard Zorzi, Michael Plöderl, Bernd Dormayer, Roland Winkler, Bernd Mazagg
Austria

The Flood
Icon Films in association with Natural History Film Unit Botswana for National Geographic
Sound by: Richard Lambert, Roy Noy
United Kingdom

Wild Shetland
Maramedia Ltd for BBC Scotland
Sound by: Kate Hopkins, Owen Shirley & Mitch Dorf, Ben Peace, Wounded Buffalo
United Kingdom

See: Wildscreen Festival 2020 goes virtual & Wildscreen Panda Awards 2018 Winners Announced!

Follow etc: facebook.com/wildscreenfest & twitter.com/WildscreenFest + instagram.com/wildscreenorg

See the Full Feature here ...

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Think Phones Disconnect Us From Nature? Think again.
by Pam Voth
22 July 2020

New Nature App, Mammalz, Changes the Narrative, Connects Today’s Generation to Nature and Each Other Using Smartphone Technology


So often, technology is blamed as the culprit for disconnecting us from nature. But a new media company is changing that perception. Mammalz, a new nature app, is re-imagining what can be done to democratize the nature media industry and reconnect people to nature around the world by using technology available in nearly everyone’s hand, the smartphone. In the hands of a Mammalz community member, a smartphone actually becomes an agent for change and the tool to connect people around the globe to nature and one another.

On Mammalz, you experience nature with other people

Using smartphone technology and a niche community approach, the Mammalz app has become the go-to choice of nature lovers from over 60 countries around the world to enjoy a dose of nature content any time of the day. Every visit to Mammalz brings a new possibility to encounter nature like you’ve never seen before. Join a live stream with a herpetologist hiking a desert canyon searching for lizards; watch a vlog from a young researcher who is studying the way people coexist with wildlife in Sierra Leone; or feel relaxation flood over you as you watch a video of colorful fish dart in and around a coral reef. Mammalz is a place for curiosity and discovery to flourish.

Becoming a star on Mammalz

Anyone with a smartphone, a great personality, a curiosity for the natural world, and a creative imagination can become a star on Mammalz. The two Mammalz co-founders are biologists-turned-wildlife filmmakers and recognize the many barriers to breaking into the nature media industry to pursue a career as a nature storyteller.

They know that old-school gatekeepers are in charge of deciding what gets produced for broadcast and that the professional camera equipment required to create natural history programming for television is extremely expensive. “These are huge obstacles. Add to that the fact that young people don’t even consume television programming,” says Rob Whitehair, Mammalz CEO and co-founder. “We realized it’s time to shake up our own industry. We created Mammalz to give people the chance to share their own unique perspectives about the natural world, and to make a living doing it.” Future plans for Mammalz include introducing monetization tools for partnered creators.

Can the smartphone actually save the world?

The smartphone proved to be the perfect tool to create the opportunity for people to create and engage with nature content. “Right from your phone, you can live stream, vlog, take photos, edit short videos, and record audio. And it’s better quality than most video cameras from 10 years ago,” says Whitehair. “It also completely removes the barrier to entry to be able to create content. If anything, we need more voices out there championing the natural world. Not fewer voices. It would be a travesty not to harness the true potential technology has given us to make the world a better place. Our future depends on it.”

Join the Mammalz Community - It’s Free!

To download Mammalz, visit the App Store. Or visit the web platform at Mammalz.com.

Download the Mammalz App


The Mammalz Android app is planned for the future. To learn more about Mammalz, visit community.mammalz.com.

About Mammalz

Founded by biologists-turned-wildlife filmmakers, Rob Whitehair and Alexander Finden, Mammalz is the “Twitch for Nature”; a mobile- and web-based media streaming and social platform dedicated to nature storytelling and driven by community. Whether you are a professional media maker, scientist, educator, artist, writer, or one of over 600 million nature enthusiasts across the planet, Mammalz provides you with the tools to personalize your experience, share your love of nature, and truly make a difference.


Mammalz, PBC is a Public Benefit Corporation founded in May 2018 and headquartered in San Diego, CA.

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public.


Welcome to Mammalz

Invest in Mammalz here: wefunder.com/mammalz

See the Full Feature here ...

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WE WANT TO LIVE – UK REBELLION ... 1st September 2020 with Extinction Rebellion

We face an intersection of global crises. Climate breakdown, COVID-19, racial injustice, economic inequality – all are symptoms of a toxic system propped up by corrupt politicians, that is driving us to extinction – a system built on inequality, the destruction of nature, and the exploitation of Black, brown and Indigenous people.

We can not carry on like this. The system is broken.

It’s 2020. Siberia is burning. Extinction is beckoning – but the Government is looking the other way. Peaceful rebellion is the only option we have before us.

Because we want to live.


WE WANT TO LIVE | UK REBELLION | 1st September 2020 | Extinction Rebellion

Join the Rebellion on 1 September, 2020: extinctionrebellion.uk/uk-rebellion-2020
Help XR mobilise and donate here: rebellion.earth/donate

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Driving Elephants – Behind The Scenes
by Kirsty Wells
4 July 2020

On one of my first nights in India we went looking for elephants.

Someone had alerted the forest department that 4 elephants had been spotted on a major highway linking the cities of Bangalore and Mysore. Mobile phone-captured images had hit the papers the previous day, clearly showing 4 elephants running along the edge of a multi-lane motorway.

The field researchers at A Rocha India (an NGO specialising in elephant conservation – whom I worked alongside in the making of the film) drove our team into the action. The team consisted of myself, volunteers, a forest department officer and the NGO field researchers who regularly assist the department with driving operations.

Pedal to the metal we raced through small towns and residential areas dimly lit by street lights until we reached a forested clearing and parked up. The evening orchestra of insects, barking dogs, human hubbub and the gentle hum of traffic was interrupted by flashes of light and the loud bangs of firecrackers. We nervously waited at the car as some of our group went into the darkness armed with torches to join the forest watchers as they made a line to drive the elephants through the clearing and out into the open.

When you look at the mosaic landscape that surrounds Bannerghatta National Park you realise how challenging this situation is to manage. With 40% of the northern range of the park within Bangalore’s municipal limits, the landscape quickly erupts from forest to dense urban settlements with major roads and railways scattered throughout. Bannerghatta is perhaps the only elephant inhabited national park in India that lies this close to an urban metropolis. Within just a few kilometres, escaped elephants find themselves deep in human settlements.

Bannerghatta National park is a long but narrow fragment of the expansive Mysore elephant range that extends across the states of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. This range is home to the largest congregations of Asian Elephants in the world and Bannerghatta is home to around 160 of them.

As India’s population has soared this range has constricted but elephants still make large migrations between territories to look for new mates and habitat. Despite inviolate pockets like Bannerghatta and other major parks including Nagarhole and Bandipur remaining fenced and protected, there is little that can be done to stop these giants dispersing beyond their man-made boundaries, enacting the typical behaviour of a large migratory species.

That first night I was struck by how impossible the management of elephants becomes once they breach the confines of wilderness and become trapped in the maze of towns and cities. Not only having to navigate through a labyrinth of man-made structures but also contending with the presence of local people.

Drives mostly take place at night because moving elephants during the day would be too risky for members of the public. One major drawback of working at night however, is not being able to see, and in spite of their size, elephants are very skilled at disappearing without a trace. And on this occasion, the efforts to drive the elephants from their forest grove proved unsuccessful – the elephants had moved on, we were too late.

That same night we drove on further. Members of the public had alerted the forest department of elephant sightings in a patch of territorial forest a few kilometres away – the elephants had somehow given us the slip. When we arrived we saw evidence of elephant movement – broken fences and collapsed walls. Department staff and vehicles surrounded the wild enclave and again formed a line within it to try to flush the group of bulls out so they could be pushed to an area of safety.

The scene was chaotic with various different forest department’s called upon, along with police and other land managers present. After some time it seemed the elephants had vanished once again under the cover of darkness. The vehicles congregated and the department staff regrouped to discuss their possible movements and how to proceed.

Just as the dust had settled, a local gentleman in great panic drove up on a moped. He was screaming hysterically, explaining how a group of elephants had intersected him on his way home from work – this moment is captured in the opening sequence of Driving Elephants. Driving up a narrow road he found himself head to head with a group of bull elephants. Unable to turn around and with his mother behind him he feared for their lives. And, rightly so. Wild elephants are volatile are very dangerous, especially in the midst of such a stressful situation. Despite this man’s sighting just moments earlier when the forest department reached the location, the elephants were gone. It seemed that once again these animals had outsmarted this army of people, and as light returned to the sky, we retired for the night.

That particular group of elephants spent close to 2 weeks outside of the park and covered an impressive distance in the process – traversing a major river, highways and multiple towns. The forest department worked tirelessly to get them back safely but their efforts were continually thwarted by interference from members of the public. This became one of the most poignant take-aways from my time observing driving operations. Just how often members of the public obstruct and impede them.

When a wild elephant appears in your town or village (particularly those many kilometres from the National Park) you have every right to be interested. The problem is the congregation of crowds once the word has got out. Pictures and status’ on social media spread frenzy and before long swarms of local people create blockades to drives – unwittingly putting themselves and the lives of forest watchers at risk, often for a simple photo op.

When the forest department are alerted of elephant sightings outside of the park they track them and tend to surround them during the day to try to prevent them moving further – largely to avoid damage and destruction to people and property. In these human-dominated areas elephants avoid open spaces and take shelter in small oases of nature – forest groves, plantations and farmland. Routes are meticulously planned to drive elephants back to the forest as quickly and as safely as possible, trying to avoid major traffic routes and dense areas of inhabitation.

During the drive the movement of elephants can be incredibly random as they are under high stress, they will streak in any direction they think poses the least threat at that moment. Thus when they stumble across a barrage of people armed with cameras and smart phones they will likely double back and flee which puts the co-ordinated efforts in jeopardy.

The role that members of the public play became a pivotal point I wanted to raise in the film because creating awareness of their impact is a small way that change could be asserted quickly – certainly to residents of Bangalore and the surrounding areas.

The fact that driving as a management strategy exists is in itself contentious and opens up a broader sphere of problems facing elephants in the region. Inadequate fencing has been responsible for many escapes but even with reinforcements many elephants are able to pass through these barriers without much issue. In addition, many of the mechanisms employed to deter crop-raiding (which have proved successful in parts of Africa) – such as using bees and chilli fencing – are problematic in such a densely populated environment. The reality becomes just moving elephants from one farm to the next rather than preventing them coming at all.

It is a great concern that these wonderful creatures are being put into such hostile and stressful situations as they disperse from natal territories. It is a perhaps the biggest worry for the farmers on the fringes that are perpetually raided for the crops they require to sustain their families throughout the year. However, the farmers I spoke with were amazingly tolerant and resilient in the face of such strife on their doorstep.

Ravi Nayak who is interviewed in the film was attacked by an elephant on his way to work the first week I arrived and before I left, several months later, I had the chance to speak with him. Ravi had spent the preceding months in intensive care having suffered life threatening injuries and despite the scars across his body and the metal pins in his legs, his opinion of elephants as a species was remarkable. When asked what he thought of elephants following the attack, he simply responds that he was going for his livelihood as the elephant was going for his.

Without doubt, those living on the park’s periphery have a greater understanding of the ecological importance of their native wildlife and similarly the danger they pose. They are able to coexist – however haphazardly at times – through a laudable level of tolerance and a good relationship with the forest department, although this is not always the case.

Corruption in the higher ranks of this government department which is responsible for all the species within forest areas (and when they come out), makes them the victim of much persecution and blame. Whilst a few top officials may wrongly stockpile funds and resources for personal gain, those attributes are rarely found amongst the frontline workers.

Forest watchers are paid a very small salary and are expected to routinely put themselves in dangerous situations. Of the forest watchers we spoke to, several mentioned the burdens for their own families when they stay out for many nights on watch or during drives and the fear that they may not return at all. There is also tension in communities between forest watchers and farmers who suffer crop losses and who see them as part of the problem. Having spent time observing their work, I saw first-hand many dedicated frontline forest watchers, working ill-equipped but providing invaluable skills in the form of tracking and an unteachable knowledge of the forest.

Without doubt, there are many shortcomings with how elephants are managed and how the forest department is equipped to deal with this increasing conflict. What I intended Driving Elephants to show was the harsh reality of this struggle in an increasingly urbanised landscape. Whilst Bannerghatta might be slightly unusual in its placement, elephant excursions are commonplace across the country and with India’s population still increasing it will likely become an archetype of this increasingly urbanised issue.

Furthermore, I hope it raises awareness of a problem taking place on the doorsteps of many Bangalore residents – many of whom are unaware of the park’s existence.

Much the same as the rest of the planet, the larger issues prompting this conservation battle revolves around habitat loss and human encroachment. Whilst there are great strides being made to enhance connectivity with corridors across the country, without these short-term measures and perhaps a more pragmatic approach for population management, these incidents will likely become increasingly common in the future.

Thus the fate of elephants in Bannerghatta, for now at least, relies on the continual work of the forest department to keep them within the safety of the protected area.

Watch the film:


Driving Elephants (Official Video)

Visit kondorfilms.co.uk/driving-elephants & drivingelephants.netlify.app to find out more about the film.

Support A Rocha: arocha.org/en/donate

See the Full Feature here ...

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QUEEN OF BIRDS – The Great Philippine Eagle from Dan O’Neill

The great Philippine eagle seems more like a creature from a story than that of reality. Standing at a metre tall, with a 7ft wingspan and dagger-like talons, they are truly formidable animals, but with just 400 pairs left in the wild, are the most endangered raptors in the world.

In December 2019, a young female Philippine eagle was miraculously rescued from the ocean off the south coast of Mindanao. The bird was starving, exhausted and after changing hands several times, was taken to the Philippine Eagle Foundation for rehabilitation. She was named 'Maasim'.

On news of Maasim's story, biologist, Dan O'Neill, heads to the Philippines to follow her journey back to the wild. But after a major setback, the mission is turned upside down...


QUEEN OF BIRDS | Documentary Film | The Great Philippine Eagle

Follow Dan for updates: instagram.com/danowild & facebook.com/DanWildlife

To support Philippine eagle conservation and secure a future for birds like Maasim and her kind: philippineeaglefoundation.org/donate

Save the Philippine Eagle Foundation from COVID-19


Save the Philippine Eagle Foundation from COVID-19

Due to the ongoing threat of COVID-19, the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) has had to close its doors to the public. With this comes losing the foundation’s largest source of funding – visitor admission to the centre. As a non-profit organization with very limited resources, the Philippine Eagle Foundation desperately relies on this to run its day-to-day operations. With the centre closed indefinitely, the foundation will soon be unable to provide for the food and care of over 100 animals. The Philippine Eagle Foundation in Davao City, Mindanao is the only conservation breeding and rehabilitation facility for the largest and most endangered eagle on the planet and the national bird of its country. Along with 31 critically endangered Philippine Eagles, it is home to over 80 other animals that are mostly found only in the Philippines, ranging from deer and a crocodile to various raptor species. As a home to these animals, the foundation provides not only nourishment but also safety from threats to their health and wellbeing. Through your donations to this campaign, you can help the Philippine Eagle Foundation not only with proper care for these creatures but with the necessary measures to ensure their safety during this difficult time. Your donation will help:

  • Provide the day-to-day food of the animals
  • Keeper care
  • Shelter maintenance
  • Veterinary care (in case of emergency)

In this crisis, we remember not just each other, but also the animals that depend on our care. Thank you. Dan O'Neill Patron, Philippine Eagle Foundation

Supprt here: gofundme.com/f/save-the-philippine-eagle-foundation-from-covid19

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AUCEF's New Film "Unbreathable: The Fight for Healthy Air" Premiered June 18th at a Virtual DCEFF

CEF’s new film, "Unbreathable: The Fight for Healthy Air," premiered (virtually), on June 18th with the DC Environmental Film Festival and a live panel discussion at 5:00pm EST. Panelists included: Mustafa Santiago Ali,VP of Environmental Justice, National Wildlife Federation; Bill Reilly, former EPA Administrator; Shashawnda Campbell, co-founder of Free Your Voice in Baltimore; Beth Gardiner, author of “Choked”; Maggie Burnette Stogner, director of “Unbreathable" and, moderator Paul Billings, National Senior VP of Policy, American Lung Association. For more information, visit the website at www.unbreathable.org


Unbreathable: The Fight for Healthy Air Trailer

This film premieres at a critical time. Asthma is the number one health issue for children, and recent research links air pollution to higher cases and deaths from COVID-19. Environmental regulations and enforcement of existing laws are being stripped away when the need for renewable energy is more urgent than ever.

Visit: dceff.org/film/unbreathable

“A powerful and important film about one of modern America’s most consequential laws.” — Beth Gardiner, author, CHOKED

Unbreathable: The Fight for Healthy Air spotlights the ongoing struggle for clean air in the United States. Over the past fifty years, there has been major progress in significantly reducing air pollution across the nation thanks to the Clean Air Act. However, asthma continues to be the number one health issue for children and nearly half of all Americans across the country today are still impacted by unhealthy levels of air pollution. This short film shares stories of communities that are fighting for healthier air and the challenges we face to ensure healthy air for all.

Executive Produced by the Center for Environmental Filmmaking at American University, with support from the American Lung Association, AU’s Center for Environmental Policy, and the Hanley Foundation.


UNBREATHABLE - The Fight For Healthy Air

On Thursday, June 18, the Center for Environmental Filmmaking held a panel discussion with director Maggie Burnette Stogner and policy experts, including Mustafa Santiago Ali (VP of Environmental Justice, National Wildlife Federation), and Shashawnda Campbell (Free Your Voice, Baltimore). You can watch a recording of that discussion below.


Unbreathable World Premiere Panel Discussion

Visit: www.environmentalfilm.org

Snake

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Three Ways the New Mammalz App is More Than Just a Social Platform for Nature Lovers
by Pam Voth
18 June 2020

Nature content creators from around the globe are flocking to Mammalz to share stories of the natural world and finding more than “likes”

Mammalz, a new community-driven user-generated content platform for all things nature offers a centralized place for today’s generation of socially savvy nature content creators, scientists, and consumers to connect with each other and create a global community around anything that advances the human-nature relationship. But even though it may look like a niche social platform for nature lovers on the surface, Mammalz is really more of a movement.

Here are three ways the Mammalz app is breaking the social media mold:

1) Global Representation

We’re throwing out the gatekeepers. Mammalz is democratizing the nature media industry. For far too long, a select, elite group has not only controlled the narrative, but maintained a narrow vision of creativity when it comes to nature storytelling. That stops now. Mammalz is the place for everyone around the world to unleash their creativity and share their stories of the natural world. Whether you’re a professional, an amateur, a scientist, an educator, or just someone who loves nature, all voices and perspectives are welcome here.

2) Reconnecting The World To Nature

Every visit to Mammalz brings a new possibility to encounter nature like you’ve never seen before. Join a live stream with a young zoo keeper, watch a timelapse video of a dragonfly emerging from its larval stage, or feel relaxation flood over you as you watch colorful fish dart in and around a coral reef. Mammalz is a place for curiosity and discovery to flourish. And it's a place where the power of community comes together to make a positive difference for the natural world.

3) Science and Education

Science is serious, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be fun! And the more you learn about nature, the more there is to love! Mammalz teams up scientists with creative media makers to convey important, complex information in a user-friendly way. On Mammalz, you can interact with subject experts  to ask questions and get answers you know are accurate. Young and old alike will find a place to fall in love with nature while discovering ways to protect it.

And, It’s Free!

To download Mammalz, visit the App Store. Or visit the web platform at Mammalz.com.

Download the Mammalz App


See the Full Feature here ...

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The Language of Protest

A film made by The Open University (Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies) June 2020

'We're living through an era of increased political protests. This film examines how protest movements go about communicating their message. Why are we seeing such an upsurge in demonstrations? What impact are they having on the political process? And how do those without access to traditional forms of power get their voice heard? Focusing on the work of Extinction Rebellion, and with contributions from journalists, activists and academics, the film is an insightful look at political communication in the era of the protest.'


The Language of Protest | Open University | Extinction Rebellion

Film made by: hamlettfilms.com
The Open University: open.ac.uk
Help XR mobilise and donate here: rebellion.earth/donate
Extinction Rebellion: rebellion.earth International: rebellion.global

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The Croatian Connection Exposed – EIA

Our Forest Campaign’s latest report revealed traders paying to ship illicit Myanmar teak into Europe via the back door. In trying to sneak the banned timber in via Croatia, the move sought to skirt EU import rules so the traders can get their hands on it for high-paying clients to use for luxury products in the marine sector, such as superyacht decking. In our report, The Croatian Connection Exposed: Importing illicit Myanmar teak through Europe’s back door, we named the European firms involved.


The Croatian Connection Exposed

Visit: eia-international.org/report/the-croatian-connection-exposed Download the report.

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We Are Mammalz – How a media company is aiming to fix the public disconnect with nature
by Rob Whitehair Co-founder and CEO, Mammalz
1 June 2020

“We can never get a re-creation of community and heal our society without giving our citizens a sense of belonging.” - Patch Adams

The first time I encountered a California Condor in the wild, it took my breath away. I wasn’t prepared for the emotional rush of having a massive prehistoric looking bird fly right over my head. It was the same heart-dropping feeling of having a bomber buzz an airfield during one of the countless airshows I attended as a child. It was something so magnificently dramatic, and profoundly humbling.

Even more dramatic was the reason the Condor was flying over my head in the first place. Just a couple of years prior to that, there were no Condors in the wild. They had been brought to the brink of extinction by human activity and then at the 11th hour, saved from their certain demise by an extraordinary and audacious act of science and humanity.

I became obsessed with how an animal, representing a stunning connection to our prehistoric past, and posing absolutely zero threat to humans, was so far gone that it could only survive as a species if humans intervened. That story, wrought with intrigue, heartbreak, ego, and drama became the subject of my first film and what ensued was a life-changing lesson.

Believing that the Condor would not survive on its own, biologists made an unprecedented move to remove all of them from the wild, then captively propagate them in zoos to get their population back to sustainable numbers. Then began a long slow process of reintroducing them back into the wild and in turn managing the wild population, a process that continues today to great success.

But that success was not met without first enduring controversy, legal battles, mounting costs, competing interests, and other human drama that threatened to sink the entire effort. So why then, was it so successful?

As it turns out, there is something powerful that happens when a disparate group of individuals, organizations, and competing interests unite over a common cause, they form community. And that lesson has proven itself time and again in my over 20 years of making natural history films and being involved in conservation efforts.

Whether the issue is wildlife, habitat, policy, or public acceptance, the formation of community has been the deciding factor for success. Giving stakeholders a sense of belonging where their voices are heard, respected, and equally considered creates a conversation, not just an information exchange. And when people start conversing and truly feel a sense of belonging, mountains move.

I am reminded of a quote from author and expert on leadership, Linda Lambert, who says, “One great conversation can shift the direction of change forever.”

I’ve experienced that many times in my life and I believe it with all my heart. So the big question is, how do we capture that sense of community that we know works on a local scale, and translate that to a global platform?

It’s not like we don’t know what to do. Throughout our history, communication and community were inextricably linked. That is, until technology allowed us to communicate to the masses. Then, communication became less about a way to share stories and converse, and more about a way to provide information. Community, in the modern age, has taken a back seat as communication has exponentially evolved into a global powerhouse that consumes us, giving us instant access to information and opinion anywhere, anytime. But that evolution has missed out on a key ingredient that helped people stay connected to life, interaction.

Media has simply become a one-way passive experience. It is my sincere belief that this is a major factor that holds the nature community back. We are a disparate group of like-minded people and organizations strewn across the globe with a common purpose, but a very loose sense of belonging, no real community. And that, I believe, is a root cause of the disconnect from nature we are experiencing today.

Today, as we catapult forward growing exponentially in both population and impact, people have become more disconnected from nature than ever. We have lost the basic understanding of our place in the mosaic of life. While we are a highly evolved complex beautiful creature standing for the most part at the apex of life, we are also, at our most simple, a vulnerable animal on this planet.

The Mammalz mission is to reconnect people to nature and we do that by taking the power that technology has given us by connecting us globally as individuals and transforming that into a sharing community, where people feel a sense of belonging, can interact with each other, and can have meaningful conversations.

But how do we actually do that? Through all of the lessons learned about community, media, human nature, and our connection to this planet and each other, we have whittled it down to a three-step process that we believe will be game-changing in helping Mammalz reconnect the world to nature.

The first thing we do is democratize participation giving everybody on the platform an equal voice and the ability to interact with one another and create conversations rather than everybody just talking at one another.

The second thing we do is create an atmosphere where truth, facts, science, creativity, and respect are not an option, but the standard.

Finally and most importantly, we need to think beyond today’s assumptions and operate from a shared global vision of what community actually means. How we create shared purpose, self-worth, value, inclusivity, equality, diversity, and then harness that vision to find real-world, long-lasting, meaningful solutions to the problems facing our natural world.

I’ll leave you with a favorite quote of mine, from Thomas Berry that is so apropos in light of the current pandemic and the other massive issues we face today.

"The natural world is the larger sacred community to which we belong. To be alienated from this community is to become destitute in all that makes us human. To damage this community is to diminish our own existence.”

We are Mammalz and we are all in this together. We welcome each and all of you to this community. If you love nature, this is your home.


Welcome to Mammalz

Download Mammalz from the App Store.

Mammalz is also available as a web platform at Mammalz.com.

Download the Mammalz App

About Mammalz

Founded by biologists-turned-wildlife filmmakers, Rob Whitehair and Alexander Finden, Mammalz is the “Twitch for Nature”; a mobile- and web-based media streaming and social platform dedicated to nature storytelling and driven by community. Whether you are a professional media maker, scientist, educator, artist, writer, or one of over 600 million nature enthusiasts across the planet, Mammalz provides you with the tools to personalize your experience, share your love of nature, and truly make a difference.

Mammalz, PBC is a Public Benefit Corporation founded in May 2018 and headquartered in San Diego, CA.

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public.

See the Full Feature here ...

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Invest in Mammalz!

The first community-driven content platform for all things nature.

We started Mammalz to revolutionize the way the world communicates about and connects to nature. TV is old. YouTube, Facebook, and others are missing the thing that binds us together - a sense of community. Mammalz is a global, interactive community that unleashes the power of creativity to show you nature in ways that you've never experienced. Rob Whitehair Co-Founder, CEO @ Mammalz

While we gaze out our windows at the trees, the clouds, and the birds, many of us are realizing how much we’ve taken the natural world for granted. Staying connected to nature is a challenge in isolation, but even more dispiriting is our constant struggle to stay connected to each other. As it becomes ever more clear from scientists that a disregard for nature and lack of understanding about how humans fit into the mosaic of the natural world has landed us in the current pandemic crisis, our launch of Mammalz has become even more timely and poignant. The good news is that by simply joining the Mammalz community, we can immediately begin to discover inspiring nature stories, unleash our creativity to share our own perspectives about the natural world, and connect with a global community who loves nature as much as we do.

Our team at Mammalz is now prouder than ever to stand behind our mission: to promote a greater global understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public. And with your support, our Wefunder investors, we are delighted to announce that Mammalz is available for free across the globe on the App Store and the web. We invite you all to join us in the new way to experience nature.

Why you may want to invest in Mammalz:

1 - We are revolutionizing the way we connect with nature during a time when we all need it most.
2 - Active users spend over 1 hour per day on Mammalz.
3 - Over 20% of our monthly active users are active daily.
4 - 37% average post engagement rate - 9x higher than our competitors.
5 - $300,000 secured in prior investments.
6 - With a TAM of over 600 million nature enthusiasts, we can create an entirely new content economy.
7 - We are enabling thousands of nature content creators to make a living doing what they love.

Find out more and invest here: wefunder.com/mammalz

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Listen to So Hot Right Now – a brand new Podcast from award-winning film-maker Tom Mustill & journalist Lucy Siegle

To save the world we need to change the story. Nature and the climate are in crisis. To survive we must use our most powerful tool - communication. Telling these stories can be difficult and dangerous. But done right they can change the world. Join environmental journalist Lucy Siegle (The Guardian, The One Show) and wildlife filmmaker Tom Mustill (Greta Thunberg/#NatureNow & BBC Natural History Unit) as they learn how to communicate better, from those who do it best.

Legendary broadcaster Sir David Attenborough, former president of Ireland Mary Robinson, singer and activist Ellie Goulding, UN climate negotiator Christiana Figueres, Native American Veteran and Organizer Krystal Two-Bulls, and other master communicators all share their hard-earned insights. Informal, personal and passionate, these conversations will give you the tools to play your part, whether you’re phoning your dad, or addressing the United Nations.

Visit: smarturl.it/sohotrightnow

See: instagram.com/sohotpod

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Wildscreen Festival 2020 goes virtual
By Wildscreen
28th May 2020

Wildscreen, the UK-based not-for-profit conservation organisation behind the biennial Wildscreen Festival, today announces the 20th anniversary edition of the Festival will bring the natural world to the online world this October.

Seizing the opportunity for evolution in light of the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, the reimagined virtual event will be the most accessible Wildscreen Festival to date, with more people than ever before being able to tune in to its ground-breaking content and benefit from the events unrivalled networking opportunities.

Wildscreen’s patron, renowned naturalist David Attenborough says, “Never has communicating the threats facing our natural world and the bold solutions required to protect and restore it been so vital. Wildscreen, with its convening power is uniquely placed to support and challenge those who can tell the stories the world needs to hear and see.”

The online edition of the Festival, already slated for the 19-23 October, will include everything that the international industry expects from the genres’ leading event, including keynotes, masterclasses, sessions, commissioner meetings, film premieres and screenings with director interviews, and a new programme of one-to-one meetings.

Over 300 films will also be available over a three-month period between September to December, which will then be accompanied by all the industry content released during the Festival week from Friday 23 October.

Martha Holmes, Wildscreen Festival Advisory Board Chair and Head of Natural History at Plimsoll Productions, said,

“During these unpredictable and unprecedented times, never have amazing stories about nature been more needed.

Our vision for a virtual Wildscreen Festival in October 2020, not only reflects the times we are living in but opens our community up to more creators, bigger audiences and more buyers, enabling the Festival to reach them in their homes, offices and field stations.”

Lucie Muir, CEO of Wildscreen continued, “We already had plans for live-streamed content and networking events hosted in global hubs beyond Bristol during the 2020 Wildscreen Festival to reduce the environmental impact of the event and bolster greater access and inclusion across the industry. The pandemic has accelerated and focused us on those ambitions and gives us the opportunity to be bold and reimagine what a future Wildscreen Festival and industry could look like.

“Though we love Bristol and it’s our home, the pandemic has shown more than ever that we need to nurture and support natural world storytelling talent and audiences around the world and demonstrate leadership in democratising the industry.”

BBC Studios is also announced as Principal Sponsor.

Julian Hector, Head of the Natural History Unit and Wildscreen Board member says:

“BBC Studios fully supports Wildscreen’s bold and ambitious move online which will open the festival up to new voices and new audiences and continue to support the global wildlife filmmaking industry.”

Also announced today is the first keynote, an interview with Sky’s Group Chief Executive Jeremy Darroch.

Under his leadership, Sky has saved over a billion trees in the Amazon Rainforest, campaigned for healthy oceans and set the ambitious target for its business to become net zero carbon by 2030.

This week, the broadcaster launched three factual channels, including Sky Nature a dedicated home to natural history programming.

The week will also feature a virtual version of the Wildscreen Panda Awards. The celebration, to be held on 22 October, will reveal the winners of the most coveted prize in the global wildlife film and TV industry.

Full three-month industry passes for Wildscreen Festival will cost £125 ( VAT where applicable), with concessions offered at £50, to further Wildscreen’s mission to diversify the natural world storytelling industry.

Full ticketing options being announced in July via the Wildsreen website: www.wildscreen.org/festival

See the Full Feature here ...

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Introducing Jackson Wild Live

Weekly live programming streaming on Instagram and Facebook, Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12pm EST!

Jackson Wild is launching a summer series of online experiences to keep our community connected and engaged with innovators within our industry, new ideas and one another. Join weekly conversations and Q&As with some of the world’s most influential filmmakers, conservationists and scientists, live streamed on Facebook and Instagram. Most importantly, we miss you and we want to hear from you! Click here to let us know what programs you would like to see and participate in during this time.


Jackson Wild Live: Protecting and preserving wild places

As "shelter in place" orders are lifted and parks and outdoor recreational areas open to eager visitors, it's time we start thinking about how we re-enter the natural world. We all have the ability to be the best stewards of our planet's wild places once we can travel again. But where do we begin? We'll hear from Sally Snow, Jackson Wild's 2019 Rising Star Award recipient and Whitney Caskey, the Curriculum Director of University of Wyoming's Guide Certificate Program. As leaders in the conservation and tourism space in the Philippines and Jackson Hole, they have a lot to say about re-opening the planet's wild landscapes to visitors. How can communities supported primarily through tourism refine communication strategies and guiding practices that foster better environmental stewardship? And how can we as individuals set a good example?

Visit: jacksonwild.org/live.html

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Nick Upton wins International Photography Award
by Jason Peters

15 May 2020

Nick Upton has just been awarded the Conservation Documentary Award at the Bird Photographer of the Year 2020 for a portfolio of six images documenting Swift Conservation in the UK.

The competition attracted over 15000 entries from over 60 countries, with the Conservation Documentary Award given for a set of images and captions telling a bird-related conservation story in a photo-journalistic style.

Nick’s portfolio showed how nest boxes, rescue and ringing work are helping to support and monitor Swifts in the UK, whose numbers have declined by 50% in the last 20 years. His work was helped by Bradford-on-Avon Swift Group, Action for Swifts, Swift Conservation and several Swift enthusiasts across England.

BPOTY has just launched a new Bird conservation charity, Birds on the Brink partly funded by the competition, and in the month that Swifts, much loved summer visitors to the UK that have just arrived back from wintering in Africa, the charity’s first donation is to Hampshire Swifts to fund the installation of Swift nestboxes at Winchester cathedral.

Winning images on the left but see then larger with descriptions here.

All photos © Nick Upton / naturepl.com

BPOTY judge and member of the Birds on the Brink advisory panel Mark Carwardine shares his thoughts on the decline in the UK Swift population and announces the winner of the BPOTY Conservation Documentary Award 2020:


SWIFT CONSERVATION

Photographer and film maker Nick Upton from the United Kingdom is the inaugural winner of the Bird Photographer of the Year Conservation Documentary Award for 2020. Nick supplied a fantastic series of images depicting the decline of the UK Swift population and the local conservation projects that are being undertaken to help halt the decline in Swift numbers. In this video Nick explains how he took the images:


Nick Upton's BPOTY video

Visit: birdpoty.co.uk/conservation-documentary-award-1

See/Support:
Action for Swifts – www.actionforswifts.blogspot.com
Swift Conservation – www.swift-conservation.org
Birds on the Brink – www.birdsonthebrink.co.uk

Visit Nicks' Profile Page: www.wildlife-film.com/-/NickUpton.htm
Links to Nicks' stills & video clips with agents: www.naturepl.com, www.alamy.com & www.rspb-images.com

See the Full Feature here ...

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Marshmellow - "Secrets Of The Universe' ... via The Sound Room

Marshall Smith AKA Marshmellow has a new album out and it's called Secrets of the Universe ... And who wouldn't want some of those!?

The first single from the new album is called: 'The Planet Breathes' ... Listen:


The Planet Breathes - Marshmellow

Visit: www.marshmellow.co.nz

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Happy 94th Birthday to Sir David Attenborough!

The great man that is David Attenborough turned ninety four years old on the 8th of May!

We loved this 94 years in 94 seconds from BBC One on Facebook.

The broadcaster, naturalist and all-round living legend is celebrating another year. He's been helping people develop a greater appreciation for the world around them throughout his epic career. Here are some reasons why so many love him: bbc.co.uk/newsround/52589991

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Want to make a difference? Watch & Share the Wildlife Winners & Losers Film Series produced by Richard Brock & largely edited by Gareth Trezise ... Use these films to help save the planet!

And the Wildlife Winners are… I’m wildlife filmmaker and producer Richard Brock. For many years I worked for the BBC’s prestigious Natural History Unit alongside David Attenborough. My series “Wildlife Winners and Losers” looks carefully with well-documented evidence at these changes – past, present and particularly the future. Using previously unseen footage from the recent past we bring the story right up to date and try to look forward as to the winners and the losers we might expect – and why. As far as I know, no one has done this so deliberately around the world with so many species and places. In the 80+ shortish films most recently finished in 2020 we find many examples of winners, or, at least those trying not to be losers! The natural world is changing very quickly now. The clock is ticking faster and faster. Some species are winning, some are losing.

So, here FOR FREE are films to use as AMMUNITION to help save the planet:


Wildlife Winners & Losers - How to turn Losers into Winners!

Do you feel, increasingly, that there’s a new need to explain to people the plight of wildlife, and the planet, which we all depend on? Now’s your chance, for free, to get the message out there around the world. Help distribute hope and knowledge with Wildlife Winners and Losers – how to turn losers into winners. These films are yours to view and, please pass on – see Brock Initiative YouTube ... It’s a call to action! A unique opportunity to help the planet!

“We’ve been celebrating nature by bringing its wonders to the TV screen all over the world. Now that world is changing, faster and faster, and nature needs help. Films can do that, at a local level, be it with decision makers in the government or in the village.” Richard Brock Founder of the Brock Initiative

What you can do:

  • choose subjects that inspire and interest you
  • watch the the films
  • share with as many people as possible – by as many means as possible!
  • use the series to inspire you to help save the planet
  • use the series to give you ammunition to help save the planet

Sir David Attenborough says:

“Richard’s interest in and concern for the natural world has resulted in the formation of the Brock Initiative. He and his team intend to reach people locally in order to make a difference on the ground. I wish him every success.”

Visit: brockinitiative.org/use-these-films-to-help-save-the-planet

Follow: twitter.com/Winners_Losers_, tumblr.com/blog/brockinitiative & facebook.com/winnerslosersfilms

Gareth's Website: www.wildlifeinmotion.com

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Follow the Brock Initiative on Instagram!

The Brock Initiative is finally on Instagram!

We will be sharing Richard Brock's news there, including all things Brock Initiative and especially focusing on the Wildlife Winners & Losers film series!

As we navigate our way through the climate crisis and current pandemic we look towards films that can inform and inspire ... It's not too late to save the planet and ourselves! Watch Meet Richard Brock ... The main man behind the Brock Initiative and his epic Wildlife Winners & Losers film series!!

Great comment from philfairclough, clearly a fan:

Richard Brock is the man David Attenborough SHOULD have been. 25 years ago when I was at the BBC Natural History Unit... after a lifetime of filming the world and producing Sir David ... Richard traded in his BBC pension, picked up a camera himself, and travelled the globe filming, producing and appearing in a series about environmental issues. Issues that were very obviously assailing nature and all of us. Issues that others were content to sweep under the carpet and continue to promote the illusion, through carefully cropped and gorgeous imagery, that God was in his heaven and all was right with the world. Richard saw the reality and ACTED on it putting his money where his mouth was. I had the great pleasure of knowing him then ... much more of a gentleman than me... but with real fire and force of conviction. Look closely at everything In the Brock Initiative ... you’ll see wisdom and evidence that everything we are experiencing now ... was known about and could have been acted on a quarter century ago. I salute you Richard. Should be SIR Richard. Thank you for keeping on keeping on!

We couldn't agree more.

Follow: @brock_initiative

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Mammalz App is Now Live On the App Store – Download for Free to Enjoy Nature for this Generation
from Mammalz
30 April 2020

The Mammalz iOS mobile app and web platform give people around the globe an innovative, highly interactive way to connect to nature and socialize while social distancing.

Mammalz, a community-driven user-generated content platform for all things nature is now available on the App Store.

This free app offers a centralized place for today's generation of socially savvy nature content creators, scientists, and consumers to connect with each other and create a global community around anything that advances the human-nature relationship.

Mammalz supports all forms of media: live streaming, video, photos, 360/VR, and podcasts.

And, Mammalz goes way beyond the "like" button with engagement tools like live stream chat, comments, direct chat, and discussion boards, all designed to help people socialize, even when times like this require social distancing.

Download Mammalz from the App Store.

Mammalz is also available as a web platform at Mammalz.com.

Download the Mammalz App



Mammalz iOS Launch on App Store

Now Sharing on Mammalz

The global community on Mammalz is growing fast and so is the variety and diversity of entertaining and educational nature content being uploaded every day.

Live streamers take viewers along on their hikes and answer questions about the birds and plants they encounter.

A zookeeper hosts regular AMA (ask me anything) sessions via live stream.

Creators inspired by Steve Irwin upload short presenter-lead films with a goal to educate and entertain about the natural world. Science communicators take viewers into the field to demonstrate proper field biology techniques.

Filmmakers around the world share long-form documentaries about anything from conservation science, to wild harvesting a gourmet meal from the land.

Behind the scenes videos and outtakes bring viewers even closer to the action and into the in-the-know fold.

Wildlife and landscape photographers share their best work along with stories about getting the shot.

And throughout the Mammalz community, a high level of engagement between creators and their audiences is evidence of how much fun people are having while learning about the natural world.

Global Pandemic Spotlights Need to Understand, Respect, and Connect to Nature

As it becomes ever more clear from scientists that a disregard for nature and lack of understanding about how humans fit into the mosaic of the natural world has landed us in the current pandemic crisis, today’s launch on the App Store is even more timely and poignant.

The good news is that by simply using the Mammalz app, people can immediately begin to discover inspiring nature stories, unleash their creativity to share their own perspective about the natural world, and connect with a global community who loves nature as much as they do.

“The natural world is struggling with more human-inflicted chaos than ever before. Extinction rates are soaring, and the clock is ticking,” says Alex Finden, Mammalz Co-Founder and COO.

“Fortunately, there are millions of young people, scientists, storytellers, and nature fanatics who care, including us, but we haven't had an effective platform to communicate with...until now. We are Mammalz, and we're on a mission to advance the relationship between humans and the natural world in the most fun way possible.”

A Vision So Much Bigger Than an App – Mammalz Mission to Create Champions for the Natural World

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public.

As the highly engaged Mammalz community scales to millions of users, the company intends to incorporate creative solutions to solve the natural world’s greatest problems. With recent innovation in data science, creating an augmented experience of nature that emphasizes education and promotes real-life engagement will become a reality. The vast amount of encrypted multimedia data will also allow Mammalz to accelerate the rate at which conservation scientists can decode, track, and put a stop to wildlife trafficking.

“More than ever, we need a safe place where we can be inspired by nature, a trusted place to communicate and interact with one another while sharing truthful, scientifically accurate information,” says Rob Whitehair, Mammalz Co-Founder and CEO. “We need to hear from multiple, diverse perspectives around the globe to widen the understanding of what nature means to the global community. This will help us gain not only more knowledge and understanding of life on Earth, but more compassion and empathy for our fellow humans. Welcome to Mammalz.”

The Mammalz Android app is planned for the future. To learn more about Mammalz, visit community.mammalz.com.


Welcome to Mammalz

About Mammalz

Founded by biologists-turned-wildlife filmmakers, Rob Whitehair and Alexander Finden, Mammalz is the “Twitch for Nature”; a mobile- and web-based media streaming and social platform dedicated to nature storytelling and driven by community. Whether you are a professional media maker, scientist, educator, artist, writer, or one of over 600 million nature enthusiasts across the planet, Mammalz provides you with the tools to personalize your experience, share your love of nature, and truly make a difference.

Mammalz, PBC is a Public Benefit Corporation founded in May 2018 and headquartered in San Diego, CA.

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public.

Rob Whitehair, Co-Founder and CEO

Rob is a 20-year veteran of the natural history film industry. He is a multi-award-winning filmmaker, producer, and executive who has directed, produced and shot films for broadcast and theatrical markets worldwide. He is known throughout the industry for his vision, leadership, inspiration and his ability to take seemingly impossible ideas and turn them into a reality. Mammalz is the culmination of Rob’s dream to create a next-generation media platform that will connect people on a global scale through their love for nature.

Alexander Finden, Co-Founder and COO

Inspired by the underwater world, Alex is a highly creative, award-winning wildlife filmmaker, Divemaster, YouTube channel manager, Twitch content editor, and operational guru. He is known for being a master of details, turning ideas into actions, and keeping calm in the storm. Alex is fascinated with portable live-streaming technologies and plans to encourage outdoor streaming as one of the most popular content types on Mammalz.

See the full feature here...

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43rd Annual (First Virtual) International Wildlife Film Festival Award Winners Announced
from IWFF
24
April 2020

Congratulations to the IWFF 43 award winning films.

We are pleased to announce the Award Winners for the 2020 International Wildlife FIlm Festival. The 43rd IWFF Awards were Announced Online, on Friday, April 4th.


IWFF 2020 · Official Trailer

Hundreds of films. Three finalists per category. ONE 2020 category winner.

Animal Behavior


Dancing With The Birds | Official Trailer | Netflix

Dancing with the Birds
Director/Producer: Huw Cordey, Silverback Films
Duration: 50min
A journey deep into the forest, following the glorious colours and curiosities of rarely seen birds-of-paradise, bowerbirds, and manakins as they show off in spectacular fashion in their search for a mate--much of which has never been filmed before. The film carries its own pedigree, narrated by the Emmy Award-winning Stephen Fry, who guides the viewer through this charming and playful documentary suitable for all the family.


Huw Cordry with Dancing with the Birds, 2020 IWFF winner

Best Children’s Film


Gajah Borneo: A stop motion animation

Gajah Borneo
Director: Shervin Hess
Duration: 5min
In a land ruled by the palm oil trade, a Borneo pygmy elephant calf comes to life in a stop-motion world made out of recycled paper.

Best Feature Film


WATSON Trailer

Watson
Director: Lesley Chilcott Producers: Loise Runge, Lesley Chilcott, Wolfgang Knöpfler
Duration: 1hr 40min
Part pirate, part philosopher, Greenpeace co-founder Paul Watson has dedicated his life to fighting for one thing: ending the slaughter of the ocean’s wildlife and the destruction of its ecosystems. This provocative film examines a man who will stop at nothing to protect what lies beneath.

Best Living With Wildlife Film


OVERLAND | Official Trailer | (2020)

Overland
Director: Elisabeth Haviland James, Revere La Noue Producers: Elisabeth Haviland James, Revere La Noue
Duration: 1hr 42min
Overland explores the complex bonds between three humans and the raptors they train and love. Lauren trains injured eagles to fly and hunt while scouring the world for falconry secrets. But a traumatized eagle which seems beyond repair pushes her to the brink. Giovanni left Rome for a solitary life in the countryside with his hawks. After a transcendent experience with an 800-year-old falconry book, he begins to question his life’s purpose. In Dubai, Khalifa is training to be the world’s best falcon racer. Now, with urban life encroaching, he must find a way to keep his fragile Bedouin culture from vanishing forever.

Best New Vision Film

IWFF 43 – Lost Cities
Lost Cities

Lost Cities
Directors: Marita Davison, Jennifer Moslemi, Ruth Gates Producers: Maria Davison, Jennifer Moslemi
Lost Cities is an interactive film that reveals the incredible hidden world of corals. With its unique layout, non-linear narrative, and evocative design, Lost Cities imparts crucial information about the crisis corals face globally while pushing the boundaries of the traditional nature documentary. The experience is anchored by an expressive soundscape and narration by the late Dr. Ruth Gates, a visionary coral biologist. By exploring what lies beneath the surface, Lost Cities brings to light the surprising way the lives of corals are interwoven with our own.

Best Short Film


The Love Bugs

The Love Bugs
Director: Allison Otto, Maria Clinton Producer: Caryn Capotosto, Jane Julian, David and Linda Cornfield
Duration: 34min
Over the course of 60 years, two married entomologists traveled to more than 67 countries, quietly amassing the world's largest private collection of insects. But as they grapple with Parkinson's in their twilight years, these two soulmates--married for 55 years--decide to give the collection away. This humorous and poignant documentary explores the love of nature--and the nature of love--and what it means to devote oneself completely to both. This film was shortlisted for a 2019 IDA Award in the Short Documentary category.

Best Short Short Film


Spawning Hope

Spawning Hope
Director/Producer: Roshan Patel
Duration: 9min 46sec
Marine biologists are concerned about the genetic health of many endangered coral species. This short film follows a team of scientists as they attempt to use cryopreserved coral sperm to introduce DNA to new populations of elkhorn coral. If this technique works, it could have a lasting impact on how conservationists are able to protect and restore endangered corals from near-extinction.

Best Student Film


Trailer - A Walk Through The Land of a Thousand Hills

A Walk Through The Land of a Thousand Hills
Director & Producer: Chema Domenech
Duration: 11min 11sec

Claver Ntoyinkima, a Rwandan park ranger, shares the secrets of Nyungwe National Park. Containing almost 300 bird species, over 1,000 plant species, and dozens of large and small mammals, Nyungwe is one of the most biodiverse places in the world. Twenty-five years after the horrific Rwandan Genocide, the park is now one of the best-conserved montane rainforests in Central Africa. As Claver walks through the forest, we discover the origins of his conservationism and the history of an ecosystem that has survived one of Rwanda's darkest periods.

Best Sustainable Planet Film


The Story of Plastic Trailer

The Story of Plastic
Director: Deia Schlosberg Producer: Deia Schosberg, Stiv Wilson, Megan Ponder, and Kyle Cadotte
Duration: 1 hr 29min
Depicting a world rapidly becoming overrun with toxic material, The Story of Plastic brings into focus an alarming man-made crisis. Striking footage, original animations, and archival material combine in this timely documentary to reveal the disastrous impact of the continued manufacture and use of plastics, shedding new light on a pressing global challenge which threatens the life expectancy of animals, humans, and Earth itself.

Best Wildlife Conservation Film


Hunting the Helmeted Hornbill

Hunting the Helmeted Hornbill
Producers: Tim Laman, Tom Swartwout
Duration: 12:27
The helmeted hornbills of Southeast Asia's rainforests are frequently poached for their casques, which, like elephant ivory, are carved into luxury objects. But these birds are treasures of avian biology--dedicated mates which risk their lives to raise their young. Conservationist Yoki Hadiprakarsa and photographer Tim Laman are on a mission to tell the story of this ancient bird before it's too late.

Best of Festival Film


Tigerland - Trailer


Announcing the IWFF Best of Festival Winner!

Tigerland
Director: Ross Kauffman Producer: Xan Parker, Zara Duffy, Fisher Stevens, Ross Kauffman
Duration: 1hr 30min
Half a century ago in India, a young man rallied the world to save tigers from extinction. Today, the creed is carried on in Far East Russia. Directed by Oscar® winner Ross Kauffman (“Born into Brothels”) and produced by Oscar® winner Fisher Stevens (“The Cove”), TIGERLAND is the story about our relationship with one of the world’s most revered creatures


Tigerland - 30s Promo

Tigerland – thoughts from Sarika Khanwilkar:


Tigerland: thoughts from Sarika Khanwilkar

Sarika says "Sharing my perspectives on the Tigerland film and ways that the covid-19 pandemic might affect tiger conservation. Please visit www.wild-tiger.org and stay up to date with my work by signing up for the newsletter. Wild Tiger is a US-based non-profit dedicated to conserving Bengal tigers and their habitats. Using the wild tiger to galvanize a greater engagement in conservation."

High school level field guide for a deeper dive into the film and on Tiger Conservation in India: DOWNLOAD PDF.

IWFF Special Jury Awards


Going Nuts - Tales from the Squirrel World (Trailer)

Going Nuts: Tales From the Squirrel World - For its' exceptional cinematography.
Director: Yann Sochaczewski Producer: Yann Sochaczewski - Altay Film
Duration: 50min
Squirrels are among the most widely recognized mammals. They gladly join us for our lunches in city parks, amaze us with their acrobatics, and entertain our children as cartoon squirrels on TV. Squirrels live in an extraordinary diverse range of habitats, calling cities, deserts, mountains, and the arctic their home. Some can fly, some can swim, some live in trees or underground, others love the snow or feel cozy in the hot deserts. This documentary explores some of the most fascinating squirrel species worldwide and shows how the squirrel family became so successful dealing with extreme environments and human neighbors.


#NatureNow

#NatureNow - For its' environmental ethics and low carbon footprint.
Director: Tom Mustill Producer: Andrea Walji
Duration: 03:39
#NatureNow is a personal and passionate call to arms from Greta Thunberg and George Monbiot to use nature to heal our broken climate. Made with no flights, recycled footage, and zero net carbon. Given away for free. Viewed over 54 Million times.


Director, Tom Mustill, #NatureNow and Carrie Richer, IWFF Artistic Director - April 21, 2020

Join Director, Tom Mustill (#NatureNow) and Carrie Richer (IWFF Artistic Director) in a conversation about filmmaking, carbon footprints, wildlife film and working with Greta Thunberg and George Monbiot on #NatureNow.


See Animals

See Animals - For its' clever & prescient connection to our current times.
Director: Scott Wenner
Duration: 1min 53sec
A meditation on the beginning of the Sixth Extinction. Perfect for these pandemic-infused times.

Jury

IWFF says: Thank you to our incredible 2020 Final Jury

Ronald Tobias, Katie Schuler, and Lisa Parks

With the exception of the Living in Wildlife category which was judged by Christopher Johns, Ronald Tobias, and Lisa Parks.

Read the Juror Bios here: wildlifefilms.org/jury

Huge congrats to all winners from Wildlife-film.com, with a special mention to members Chema Domenech for his A Walk Through The Land of a Thousand Hills Student Film win, Huw Cordey, Silverback Films for their Dancing with the Birds Animal Behaviour win, Yann Sochaczewski - Altay Film for his Going Nuts: Tales From the Squirrel World Special Jury Award for exceptional cinematography and Tom Mustill for his #NatureNowSpecial Jury Award for its' environmental ethics and low carbon footprint.

Visit: www.wildlifefilms.org

See: facebook.com/InternationalWildlifeFilmFestival, twitter.com/IntlWldFilmFest & instagram.com/wildlifefilmfest

See the full feature here...

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Netflix Releases Educational Documentaries on YouTube for Free ... Including Our Planet & Chasing Coral

For many years, Netflix has allowed teachers to screen documentaries in their classrooms: help.netflix.com/en/node/57695

However, this isn’t possible with schools closed. So at their request, we have made a selection of our documentary features and series available on our YouTube channel.

If you are a parent or teacher, please check the ratings so that you can make informed choices for your students and children.


Educational Documentaries | Netflix

For more information and to download accompanying educational resources please visit the Netflix Company Blog: media.netflix.com/en/company-blog/free-educational-documentaries

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The Narrow-headed Ant – Back From The Brink

This short-film takes us on a journey through the life of the Narrow-headed Ant. Sadly, this insect is now very rare, with just one population in England, in South Devon, and without urgent action we could lose it altogether.

Back from the Brink have been working hard through our Buglife led project, to try and change the future for this incredible mini-beast: naturebftb.co.uk/the-projects/narrow-headed-ant


The Narrow-headed Ant

How did we make our Narrow-headed Ant film?

Back from the Brink talks to film-maker Neil Aldridge from Wildscreen about how our incredible Narrow-headed Ant film was made.

A Buglife led project, with the amazing help of Devon Wildlife Trust, based in Devon - we are aiming to save this incredibly rare ant, from extinction!


How did we make our Narrow-headed Ant film?...

facebook.com/NatureBftB

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WFFR Online

The Wildlife Film Festival Rotterdam have been showing nature films from past festival editions through their YouTube channel.

They say "We must all stay inside to contain the corona virus as much as possible. Unfortunately, we cannot change that. What we can do is delight you with beautiful nature films! In the coming period we will therefore show various nature films on our own YouTube channel. We will let you know which films are online via our newsletter. Thank you to the filmmakers who contributed to this special WFFR Online - Corona edition! "


WFFR Online

Visit/Support: wffr.nl/wffr-online-de-vogelwachter

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Read: Surviving the Future: Culture, Carnival and Capital in the Aftermath of the Market Economy & Lean Logic: A Dictionary for the Future and How to Survive It by David Fleming, Shaun Chamberlin

Surviving the Future
Culture, Carnival and Capital in the Aftermath of the Market Economy
by David Fleming, Shaun Chamberlin

Surviving the Future is a story drawn from the fertile ground of the late David Fleming’s extraordinary Lean Logic: A Dictionary for the Future and How to Survive It. That hardback consists of four hundred and four interlinked dictionary entries, inviting readers to choose their own path through its radical vision. More here...

Published by Chelsea Green Publishing Company, available at Amazon.com & Amazon.co.uk.

Lean Logic
A Dictionary for the Future and How to Survive It
by David Fleming
Edited by Shaun Chamberlin

Lean Logic is David Fleming’s masterpiece, the product of more than thirty years’ work and a testament to the creative brilliance of one of Britain’s most important intellectuals.

A dictionary unlike any other, it leads readers through Fleming’s stimulating exploration of fields as diverse as culture, history, science, art, logic, ethics, myth, economics, and anthropology, being made up of four hundred and four engaging essay-entries covering topics such as Boredom, Community, Debt, Growth, Harmless Lunatics, Land, Lean Thinking, Nanotechnology, Play, Religion, Spirit, Trust, and Utopia. More here...

Published by Chelsea Green Publishing Company, available at Amazon.com & Amazon.co.uk.


Shaun Chamberlin on David Fleming's "Lean Logic"

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On Earth Day, Global Pandemic Spotlights the Need to Understand, Respect, and Connect to Nature
from Mammalz
22 April 2020

Mammalz App – Nature for this Generation – Launches Today at Mammalz.com

The Mammalz web app gives people around the globe an innovative, highly interactive way to connect to nature and socialize while social distancing. An iOS version of Mammalz will be on the App Store soon

Mammalz, a community-driven user-generated content platform for all things nature, launched their web platform on the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day.

This free app offers a centralized place for today’s generation of socially savvy nature content creators, scientists, and consumers to connect with each other and create a global community around anything that advances the human-nature relationship.

Mammalz supports all forms of media: live streaming, video, photos, 360/VR, and podcasts.

And, Mammalz goes way beyond the “like” button with engagement tools like live stream chat, comments, direct chat, and discussion boards, all designed to help people socialize, even when times like this require social distancing

To sign up and create a free account, visit Mammalz.com.

Mammalz had planned an Earth Day launch of their web app long before the Covid-19 pandemic hit and forced people around the world to social distance and stay home in order to diminish transmission and save lives.

As it becomes ever more clear from scientists that a disregard for nature and lack of understanding about how humans fit into the mosaic of the natural world has landed us in the current pandemic crisis, today’s launch on what is likely the most ironic Earth Day in history, is even more timely and poignant.

The good news is that by simply using Mammalz, people can immediately begin to discover inspiring nature stories, unleash their creativity to share their own perspective about the natural world, and connect with a global community who loves nature as much as they do.

“The natural world is struggling with more human-inflicted chaos than ever before. Extinction rates are soaring, and the clock is ticking,” says Alex Finden, Mammalz Co-Founder and COO. “Fortunately, there are millions of young people, scientists, storytellers, and nature fanatics who care, including us, but we haven't had an effective platform to communicate with...until now. We are Mammalz, and we're on a mission to advance the relationship between humans and the natural world in the most fun way possible.”

As the highly engaged Mammalz community scales to millions of users, the company intends to incorporate creative solutions to solve the natural world’s greatest problems.

With recent innovation in data science, creating an augmented experience of nature that emphasizes education and promotes real-life engagement will become a reality.

The vast amount of encrypted multimedia data will also allow Mammalz to accelerate the rate at which conservation scientists can decode, track, and put a stop to wildlife trafficking.

“More than ever, we need a safe place where we can be inspired by nature, a trusted place to communicate and interact with one another while sharing truthful, scientifically accurate information,” says Rob Whitehair, Mammalz Co-Founder, and CEO. “We need to hear from multiple, diverse perspectives around the globe to widen the understanding of what nature means to the global community. This will help us gain not only more knowledge and understanding of life on Earth but more compassion and empathy for our fellow humans. Welcome to Mammalz.”

The Mammalz Android app is planned for the future. To learn more about Mammalz, visit community.mammalz.com.


Welcome to Mammalz

About Mammalz

Founded by biologists-turned-wildlife filmmakers, Rob Whitehair and Alexander Finden, Mammalz is the “Twitch for Nature”; a mobile- and web-based media streaming and social platform dedicated to nature storytelling and driven by community. Whether you are a professional media maker, scientist, educator, artist, writer, or one of over 600 million nature enthusiasts across the planet, Mammalz provides you with the tools to personalize your experience, share your love of nature, and truly make a difference.

Mammalz, PBC is a Public Benefit Corporation founded in May 2018 and headquartered in San Diego, CA.

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public.

Rob Whitehair, Co-Founder and CEO

Rob is a 20-year veteran of the natural history film industry. He is a multi-award-winning filmmaker, producer, and executive who has directed, produced and shot films for broadcast and theatrical markets worldwide. He is known throughout the industry for his vision, leadership, inspiration and his ability to take seemingly impossible ideas and turn them into a reality. Mammalz is the culmination of Rob’s dream to create a next-generation media platform that will connect people on a global scale through their love for nature.

Alexander Finden, Co-Founder and COO

Inspired by the underwater world, Alex is a highly creative, award-winning wildlife filmmaker, Divemaster, YouTube channel manager, Twitch content editor, and operational guru. He is known for being a master of details, turning ideas into actions, and keeping calm in the storm. Alex is fascinated with portable live-streaming technologies and plans to encourage outdoor streaming as one of the most popular content types on Mammalz.

See the full feature here...

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50 Incredible Natural History Moments

This Earth Day, stay in and explore the beauty, drama and spectacle of our natural world with 50 incredible natural history moments from BBC Earth based on what you've been liking and sharing.


50 Incredible Natural History Moments


10 TOP Natural History Moments | BBC Earth

Subscribe to BBC Earth on youtube.com/channel/UCwmZiChSryoWQCZMIQezgTg

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Wildscreen Announce Photo Jury 2020

Wildscreen is thrilled to announce the stellar line-up of judges for the 2020 Photo Story jury.

We’re excited to announce that Laurent Geslin, Orsolya Haarberg, Chris Packham and Tony Wu will join Chair of the jury, Kathy Moran, to review all the photo story submissions and have the difficult task of picking the winners.

Entries into the competition to date are very strong, with compelling narratives being communicated through outstanding imagery. If you want this world-class set of judges to view your work, and to be in with the chance of winning a coveted Panda Award you have until 1 May to enter via our our Film Freeway Page.

Kathy Moran, Chair

Kathy is Deputy Director of Photography at National Geographic Magazine. As National Geographic Magazine’s first senior editor for natural history projects, at the last count Kathy has edited over 320 stories. Highlights include editing a single-topic issue on the Yellowstone ecosystem and Brent Stirton’s features on Rhinos and Virunga. She has edited books for the Society include Women Photographers at the National Geographic, The Africa Diaries – An Illustrated Life in the Bush, Cat Shots and Tigers Forever, and two anthems of wildlife photography. Named Visual Editor of the Year 2017 by POYi, she was a founding member of the International League of Conservation Photographers and has been on the jury of numerous international photography competitions and award programs.She was also on the Jury for the inaugural Photo Story Panda Award in 2018. Kathy said: "Photo stories shine a spotlight on the beauty and fragility of the natural world and have huge powering in reaching hearts and changing behaviours. I am excited to discover new stories and storytellers as Chair of the Wildscreen Festival Photo Story Jury.”

Laurent Geslin

Laurent Geslin is an award-winning wildlife photographer who has worked all over the globe. But since he has moved to Switzerland, his main subject has been the European lynx. After two books about this very elusive cat, he is now working on documentary for the french and swiss cinema about wild lynx in its environment. Find Laurent online at www.laurent-geslin.com

Orsolya Haarberg

A landscape architect by training and originally from Hungary, Orsolya turned her passion for photography into a profession when shemoved to Norway in 2005. In her work, Orsolya looks for the unusual in everyday nature. She seeks the detail or the unexpected moment of light that adds atmosphere, drama or magic to a landscape. She has won prizes in competitions worldwide, including the prestigious Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year, where she also served in the jury in 2009 and 2016. She has twice been awarded the title of Hungarian Nature Photographer of the Year. Orsolya's images have been published in National Geographic magazine in both the US and international editions. Find Orlsolya online at www.haarbergphoto.com

Chris Packham

Chris Packham is an English naturalist, nature photographer, television presenter and author, best known for his television work including the CBBC children's nature series The Really Wild Show from 1986 to 1995. He has also presented the BBC nature series Springwatch, including Autumnwatch and Winterwatch, since 2009. Find Chris online at: www.chrispackham.co.uk

Tony Wu

Tony Wu's lifelong association with the sea started when he was a child. A crab pinched his toe, and it was love at first ouch. Now that he's (somewhat) grown up, Tony devotes most of his time to researching and documenting rarely seen marine animals and environments, spending more days at sea that he does on land. Tony owns more pairs of fins than he does shoes. Tony has received a number of prestigious awards, including Grand Prize in Japan's largest underwater photography contest, the prize for Best Book of the Year at the Festival of Marine Images in Antibes, and first place in the Underwater and Behaviour: Mammals categories of the annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest. Find Tony online at www.tony-wu.com | www.tonywublog.com | https://tonywu.art

From: wildscreen.org/about/news/2020-photo-jury-announcement

Dates:

  • 1 May 2020 - Film and photography submission extended deadline
  • Late Spring/Early Summer - volunteer applications open
  • August 2020 - Panda Awards nominees and Official Selection announced
  • 19 - 23 October 2020 - Wildscreen Festival, Bristol

Visit: wildscreen.org/festival

WILDSCREEN STATEMENT ON COVID-19

Our purpose here at Wildscreen is to bring people together to celebrate and protect the natural world. We will continue to monitor this evolving situation closely, taking any necessary action as required and share timely updates with our community.

Read the full statement: wildscreen.org/about/news/wildscreen-statement-on-covid-19

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Introducing new film 'The Sequel - What will follow our troubled civilisation?' + access to new Surviving the Future online course and interactive book!

(Facebook won't let us trim off the countdown, so skip to the 4hr mark for the start of the event!)

Welcome to our 'Surviving the Future' online event, available in full here, and beginning with the launch screening of BAFTA-winning director Peter Armstrong's new film 'The Sequel: What Will Follow Our Troubled Civilisation?'. Rare, in that it not only recognises the fundamental unsustainability of today's society but dares to ask the big question: What will follow?

Then stay tuned after the credits roll for conversation about just that with Caroline Lucas MP and stars of the film Rob Hopkins, Kate Raworth and Shaun Chamberlin, all of whom are involved, in their different ways, in reimagining civilisation. And in rekindling optimism in the creativity and intelligence of humans to nurse our communities and ecology back to health.

Or for more interaction, head to thesequel.net for details of two other new resources for these difficult times - an 8 week online course 'Surviving the Future: Conversations for Our Time' and the new online, interactive version of the late David Fleming's legendary 'Dictionary for the Future and How to Survive It'.

None should be barred from discussing these issues by finances, so enjoy the free stream of the film, the interactive dictionary is also currently free to access, and scholarships for the course are available.

In solidarity.


Introducing new film 'The Sequel - What will follow our troubled civilisation?'

Visit: flemingpolicycentre.org.uk/the-sequel

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Miss Connecting to Nature and Each Other? Mammalz to the Rescue! Launching Earth Day on the App Store
from Mammalz
14 April 2020

Nature is more important now than ever. Mammalz, a new iOS app and web-based platform, gives people around the globe an innovative, highly interactive way to connect with nature and socialize while social distancing.


Welcome to Mammalz

During this time of lockdown and social distancing to diminish the transmission of coronavirus and save lives, people around the world who long to connect to nature and are feeling the stress of isolation have something to look forward to.

On Earth Day, April 22, 2020, Mammalz, a community-driven user-generated content platform for all things nature, will launch their iOS app on the App Store.

As it becomes even more clear from scientists that a disregard for nature and lack of understanding about how humans fit into the mosaic of the natural world has landed us in the current pandemic crisis, Mammalz steps in with a solution. This free app offers a centralized place for today’s generation of socially savvy nature content creators, scientists, and consumers to connect with each other and create a global community around anything that advances the human-nature relationship. Mammalz supports all forms of media: live streaming, video, photos, 360/ VR, and podcasts. And, Mammalz goes way beyond the “like” button with engagement tools like live stream chat, comments, direct chat, and discussion boards, all designed to help people socialize, even when times like this require social distancing.

A Highly Engaged Community - A Look Inside Mammalz Beta

The beta version of the Mammalz iOS app launched in September 2019 on TestFlight.

Since then, a curated community of over 1,000 highly-engaged content creators and consumers have been testing and using the platform to share everything from lucky animal encounters, to stunning landscape vistas, to live-streaming primitive fire-making techniques.

This community is already 9x more engaged with content creators on Mammalz than those on generalist social media platforms.

Over 20% of active users are on Mammalz daily for an average of one hour.

Connecting to Nature in the Most Fun, Creative Ways Possible

During recent weeks when venturing far from home has been out of the question, the beta community on Mammalz has engaged in a friendly challenge to look for nature in and around their homes and shared their resulting live streams, videos, and photo posts on the platform using the #CloseToHome tag.

Some of the most fun and unique posts to come out of the #CloseToHome challenge include a wild roadrunner parading by the back door with its fence lizard dinner; a pet bearded dragon munching loudly on crunchy greens; a 21-year-old cockatiel named Pearl who loves rice pilaf; cheeky squirrels who demonstrate extreme hoarding behavior at the bird feeder; people mimicking bird calls and getting a response from the real thing; blooming succulents growing impossibly out of dead stumps; and someone who transformed their backyard trampoline into a photo hide to capture photos of tiny local Muntjac deer.

Connecting to Nature in the Most Fun, Creative Ways Possible

During recent weeks when venturing far from home has been out of the question, the beta community on Mammalz has engaged in a friendly challenge to look for nature in and around their homes and shared their resulting live streams, videos, and photo posts on the platform using the #CloseToHome tag.

Some of the most fun and unique posts to come out of the #CloseToHome challenge include a wild roadrunner parading by the back door with its fence lizard dinner; a pet bearded dragon munching loudly on crunchy greens; a 21-year-old cockatiel named Pearl who loves rice pilaf; cheeky squirrels who demonstrate extreme hoarding behavior at the bird feeder; people mimicking bird calls and getting a response from the real thing; blooming succulents growing impossibly out of dead stumps; and someone who transformed their backyard trampoline into a photo hide to capture photos of tiny local Muntjac deer.

Get a Sneak Peak Before Launch

Anyone may sign up for Mammalz. All accounts are free. For general information and links to set up an account visit community.mammalz.com.

To create an account using the web platform, go to mammalz.com. The Android version of Mammalz is planned for late 2020.


Mission-Driven Champions for the Natural World – The Future of Mammalz

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public.

As the highly-engaged Mammalz community scales to millions of users, the company intends to incorporate creativesolutions to solve the natural world’s greatest problems.

With recent innovation in data science, creating an augmented experience of nature that emphasizes education and promotes real- life engagement will become a reality. The vast amount of encrypted multimedia data will also allow Mammalz to accelerate the rate at which conservation scientists can decode, track, and put a stop to wildlife trafficking.


Intro to Mammalz from Co-founders Rob and Alex

About Mammalz

Founded by biologists-turned-wildlife filmmakers, Rob Whitehair and Alexander Finden, Mammalz is the “Twitch for Nature”; a mobile- and web-based media streaming and social platform dedicated to nature storytelling and driven by community. Whether you are a professional media maker, scientist, educator, artist, writer, or one of over 600 million nature enthusiasts across the planet, Mammalz provides you with the tools to personalize your experience, share your love of nature, and truly make a difference.

Mammalz, PBC is a Public Benefit Corporation founded in May 2018 and headquartered in San Diego, CA.

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public.

See the full feature here...

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Inhabitants of the microworld a new series from Rubén Duro Pérez – Science into Images

“Inhabitants of the Microworld” is a series of short videos produced by Science into Images that aims to show the enormous amount of organisms that inhabit the microscopic world that we cannot see with the naked eye.

These inhabitants are mainly protozoa, microalgae, microscopic animals such as tardigrades, nematodes or water fleas, as well as the initial stages of development of larger organisms, such as some mosquitoes. All of them belong to that part of ecosystems that we hardly ever pay attention to. They are many, many of them, and although they pass completely unnoticed by most of us, they are fundamental to the functioning of the biosphere as a whole.

The Inhabitants of the Microworld series is designed to serve as an educational resource to support teaching, however, due to the special circumstances arising from the COVID-19 pandemic that is hitting our society these days, we have made it available to all those interested through our YouTube channel. We hope that both educators and parents and, especially, children and young people, can enjoy it and learn with it, and that this will help them to cope better, even if it is only in small pills, with the confinement to which we are forced.

From Science into Images we would like to ask you, if you like the series, to share it with the people you think might also like it.


Habitantes del micromundo

Visit: scienceintoimages.com

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Sunny Side of the Doc's DNA goes digital: content, trends, networking

In response to the massive disruption brought about by the Covid-19 pandemic and the importance of keeping the documentary community’s activities alive, the 31st edition of Sunny Side of the Docand the 4th edition of PiXii Festival will move to an exclusively online format for the very first time, taking place on 22nd to 25th June and streamed from La Rochelle, France.

As the virus forces us indoors, we have been thinking of ways to invest in our digital spaces, and build robust connections that can compensate some of the physical proximity we’re losing. These measures demonstrate our long term commitment to sustaining the creative health of the industry and making sure WE return together to a rich and vibrant ecosytem at the end of the crisis.

In an interconnected world, this year’s Connected Edition aims to provide the viable funding opportunities, valuable market intelligence, and networking services Sunny Side of the Doc is known for.

This unique platform will enable all major industry stakeholders to connect for a series of tailor-made activities including pitch sessions, one-to-one meetings and also a significant programming of video resources and topical webinars(livestreamed Q&A, hands-on workshops, case studies) designed by top-level experts to foster extensive interactions with professional peers. What’s more, the new digital format allows for some of the online offerings to remain accessible beyond 25th June 2020.

The Sunny Side of the Doc Connected Edition is structured around three elements that are the foundation of this international marketplace’s DNA:

Content First: showcasing quality-driven projects and programmes through pitches and an online screening library; Trends and Industry Focused: having a finger on the pulse for the lastest trends and practices to help beat the crisis; Community Driven: strengthening our real-world ties and maintaining international collaboration between talent, production companies, distributors, broadcasters and cultural centres.

All our delegate passes will be streamlined into a new All Access - Connected Pass at a flat-rate fee of €200 (excl. tax) for the entire offering.

Find out more: sunnysideofthedoc.com/sunny-side-of-the-doc-2020-the-connected-edition

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Daily Self-Isolation Nature Livestreams with Chris Packham & Megan McCubbin

Catchup on all the live broadcasts from Chris & Megan in the New Forest ... Digitally assisted by Fabian Harrison.

They are calling themselves the Self-Isolating Bird Club... For those self-isolating from #COVID19 who enjoy birdwatching – tweet your sightings tagging us.

From the Wildlife Rebellion team!


Daily Self-Isolation Nature Livestreams with Chris Packham & Megan McCubbin


Megs & I are joined LIVE by Michaela Strachan this morning all the way from South Africa !

Follow on Twitter: @ChrisGPackham, @MeganMcCubbin, @fabianharrison_, @WildlifeRBLN, @SIBirdClub & @michaelastracha

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Better Butterflies by Richard Brock & Gareth Trezise

Not originally a film for the Brock Initiative's Wildlife Winners and Losers Series but Richard Brock and Gareth Trezise of wildlifeinmotion.com did this for free many years ago for Butterfly Conservation. The year was 2004 and it certainly showcases British butterfly wildlife winners and losers ...

With an introduction from Sir David Attenborough and narrated by Barry Paine this film explains the work of Butterfly Conservation and shows all of our very special butterflies and some of our moths, and the beautiful places where they survive. The film indicates what is happening to butterflies and moths in a changing world and a changing climate, and suggests how they can be helped into the future. It follows the fortunes of the endangered Marsh Fritillary across Scotland, Ireland, Wales and England through the year. All proceeds from the sale of the original dvd went to Butterfly Conservation's highest priority conservation projects aimed at saving our most threatened butterflies and moths. Now some 16 years on you can all watch it for free and like all my films nothing is monetized. Just watch, engage and share.


Better Butterflies

These are challenging times, even for our charities like Butterfly Conservation. If you want to help save butterflies and moths in the UK, there are lots of ways to contribute! Whether you want to give your time, donate to an appeal or become a member - everything helps towards their conservation work. Please follow the link to see how you could help. Thank you. Richard and Gareth.

Visit: butterfly-conservation.org/how-you-can-help

"I have always thought that butterflies represent the canaries in the coal mine, giving us early indications of man's impact on the planet. Everyone knows about the decline of the House Sparrow, but British butterflies and other insects are facing an even greater crisis than birds. I am deeply concerned that we must increase our efforts to conserve biodiversity at this critical time". Sir David Attenborough 2004

Visit: brockinitiative.org/use-these-films-to-help-save-the-planet

Please also take a look at Butterfly Conservation's Youtube account and watch many other informative videos: youtube.com/user/savebutterflies

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Watch: Earth LIVE Lessons from Lizzie Daly

Welcome the Earth Live Lessons with your Host Lizzie Daly - Biologist & Wildlife Broadcaster.

Tune into 20 minutes of daily earth lessons LIVE from around the world brought to you by some the most inspiring scientists, conservationists, wildlife filmmakers and more.

Starts on 18th March 2020. Broadcast LIVE every single day in March and April.


Earth LIVE Lessons

Lizzie Daly on social media:
www.instagram.com/lizziedalywild
www.twitter.com/LizzieRDaly
www.facebook.com/LizzieDalyWildlife

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BBC documentary highlights EIA's tiger work!

Wednesday, 4 March saw the premiere of the major new BBC2 documentary Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers.

Debbie Banks, EIA's Tiger Campaigns Leader and an internationally recognised expert in the field, made a big contribution to the programme’s research and also features in it. Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers follows former Royal Marines commando Aldo Kane exposing the shocking secrets of the illegal tiger trade in South-East Asia and those who profit from it. You can watch it on BBC iPlayer.


Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers

To coincide with the documentary, EIA has released the new report On the Butcher’s Block: The Mekong Tiger Trade Trail.

The report gives examples of how China, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam are failing to implement international decisions to end trade in the parts and derivatives of captive-bred tigers – and are, in fact, allowing the number of tigers in captivity to proliferate.

Far from relieving pressure on wild tigers by satiating the market for tiger products, trade in captive-bred tiger parts has actually perpetuated their desirability, stimulating demand not reducing it.

Vietnam is one of the worst offenders. In hideous backyard operations in lawless Nghe An Province, tiger cubs smuggled from Thailand and Laos are raised to maturity and slaughtered on commission by Vietnamese and Chinese buyers. Trusted Vietnamese brokers may pull together a group of buyers who spend a weekend on-site, watching the tiger being killed and butchered and waiting while the bones are boiled down with other ingredients into tiger bone glue, which may be for personal use, to give as a gift or to sell on within their own social networks.

EIA and its partners have also prepared the new online multimedia resource Tiger Trade Trail, showcasing facts, figures, images and video – you can find it at reports.eia-international.org/tiger-trade-trail.

Also visit: eia-international.org/wildlife/saving-tigers Support EIA's work: eia-international.org/donate

Also read: Risking life and limb on the hunt for the tiger traffickers by Laura Warner, Director of ‘Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers’,

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Jackson Wild 2020 Media Awards Open for Entry & other news!

Media today deepens understanding of the world around us, inspires commitment to protect and restore the natural systems upon which all life depends and empowers the radical changes that will be required to do so. Nature film’s equivalent to the Oscars®, the Jackson Wild Media Awards celebrate excellence and innovation in nature, science and conservation storytelling. With a panel of 150+ judges, the Jackson Wild Media Awards competition is unique in that each entry is reviewed in its entirety by multiple judges, specifically chosen for their expertise in each category.

2020 Call for entry opens March 1, and will close May 1, with finalists announced on July 15. Any film completed since June 1, 2019 is eligible to enter.

Call for Entry: Jackson Wild Media Awards 2020

Heads up filmmakers: entry for the 2020 Jackson Wild Media Awards is open! We have over 30 categories to enter and all projects completed since 6/1/19 are eligible. We can't wait to see your wonderful work! Visit www.jacksonwild.org/2020-media-awards to learn more.

Posted by Jackson Wild on Monday, 2 March 2020

Enter your film here: jacksonwild.org/2020-media-awards.html

Media Lab Application – Stay tuned - applications open March 23! The Jackson Wild Media Lab will train and mentor emerging conservation media leaders in unique programs that directly engage them influential content creators. Learn more: jacksonwild.org/2020-media-lab.html

Host a Free World Wildlife Day Screening – The annual World Wildlife Day Film Showcase creates a portfolio of programs that are presented globally at free screening events. Learn More: jacksonwild.org/biodiversity.html

Seeking Preliminary Judges for Media Awards – Are you interested in helping select the best of the best nature films? Join our team of judges! Judges who can commit to longer assignments can earn 2020 Jackson Wild Media Summit discounts. Learn more: jacksonwild.org/2020-judge-application.html

Intern in Jackson Hole – We are looking for passionate individuals to assist with organizing our 2020 programs and events! Learn more: jacksonwild.org/internships.html

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Jackson Wild World Wildlife Day Film Showcase 2020: Biodiversity Winners Announced
from Jackson Wild
03 March 2020

Jackson Wild, the Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) are excited to announce the winners of the World Wildlife Day Film Showcase: Biodiversity.

A big thanks to the preliminary jury – professional filmmakers, scientists and stakeholders from around the world – who chose the finalists from over 300 entries, as well as the final jury who selected the winners.

Winners were announced on March 3 at UN Headquarters during its World Wildlife Day Celebration, and will be showcased at screenings around the world.

A Partnership with United Nations Development Program and CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna) celebrating World Wildlife Day. In a world confronting unprecedented environmental threats, it is essential to empower locally-driven engagement that inspires action, with measurable impact.

On World Wildlife Day 2020, we celebrated wildlife as a component of biodiversity in its many beautiful and varied forms, raised awareness of the multitude of benefits of wildlife to people, the threats it's facing, and the urgent need for everyone to take actions to help conserve wildlife before it's too late. Winners were celebrated at a high-level event celebrating the launch of World Wildlife Day at UN Headquarters in NYC, on Tuesday March 3, 2020.

Winning and Finalist Films will be showcased throughout the world through special premiere and World Wildlife Day screening events as well as at the Jackson Wild Summit and through Jackson Wild On Tour.

The judges selected the winners in eight categories:

  • Science, Innovation and Exploration;
  • Issues and Solutions;
  • People and Wild Species;
  • Stories of Hope;
  • Global Voices;
  • Web of Life; Short; and
  • Micro.

World Wildlife Day 2020 Film Showcase winners:

Science, Innovation and Exploration:

Nature: The Serengeti Rules
A Production of HHMI Tangled Bank Studios and Passion Planet in association with Sandbox Films, Thirteen Productions Llc and WNET

Issues and Solutions:

Watson
Local Hero, Participant Media, Terra Mater Factual Studios

People and Wild Species:

Grasslands - North America´s Hidden Wilderness
A River Road Films production in association with CBC and Terra Mater Factual Studios

Stories of Hope:

Silent Forests
House Tiger Productions

Global Voices:

Mundiya Kepanga, The Voice of the Forest
Muriel Barra/ LatoSensu productions

Web of Life:

The Elephant Queen
An Apple Original and A Deeble, Stone and Oliff Production

Short (under 15 minutes):

How to Save Our Planet
Silverback Films

Last Wild Places: Gorongosa
National Geographic Society

Micro (under 5 minutes):

#NatureNow
A @tommustill Film for Gripping Films

Ocean Farmer
Silverback Films

Honorable Mentions, General:

Tree Climbing Lions
Nat Geo Wild

Okavango - River of Dreams - Episode 3: Inferno
A Terra Mater Factual Studios / Wildlife Films production in co-production with Thirteen Productions LLC, Doclights/NDR Naturfilm in association with PBS, CPB, Arte France / Unité Découverte et Connaissance, National Geographic Channels and SVT

Fantastic Fungi
Moving Art, Artemis Rising, Diamond Docs

Walking Thunder
Last Stand Films

Tigerland
Produced for Discovery by RadicalMedia

Gerdab
Wildlife Pictures Institute

Honorable Mentions, Short:

Beyond The Fence
Tessa Barlin in association with the Nature, Environment & Wildlife Filmmakers Congress (NEWF)

Sounds of Survival
Katie Garrett, bioGraphic

1 MILLION Species Could Go Extinct... Here’s Why. | It’s Okay to Be Smart
Spotzen, PBS Digital Studios

The Flying Gold of Arabuko
John Davies, National Film and Television School

Mexico City and its Sacred Salamanders
Katie Garrett, bioGraphic

The Firefox Guardian
Gunjan Menon, University of the West of England

Mud, Sweat, and Fears: Episode 2 of 'Last Call for the Bayou'
Encompass Films

Where Life Begins
Coral and Oak Studios, The Wilderness Society

Honorable Mentions, Short:

Ay Santa Ana
Pongo Media

Gajah Borneo
Shervin Hess, Oregon Zoo

Meet The Real Wolf
Grizzly Creek Films

Spider Monkey for Sale
An Ateles Films production by Michael Sanderson and Ana Luísa Santos

A Constituency for Conservation | Ndoki at 25
Wildlife Conservation Society

Second Chances
Eilidh Munro

The Birdman of Chorao
Shashank Bhosale

The Burrowers
Yasmine Ellis

This sites' producer, Jason Peters, was a Preliminary Judge of this comptetion.


2020 World Wildlife Day Film Showcase: Biodiversity

Visit: jacksonwild.org/biodiversity.html


World Wildlife Day 2020 - Sustaining all life on Earth


Message of Inger Andersen, Executive Director, UN Environment Programme for World Wildlife Day 2020

See the full feature here...

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Wilderland Wildlife Film Festival - UK & IRELAND Spring Tour - 2020

The UK's first touring wildlife film festival IS BACK! Wilderland brings the world's most breathtaking independent wildlife shorts to the public THIS SPRING... Touring theatres across the UK & Ireland (MARCH - MAY 2020)

  • MARCH 1st Bristol, 1532 Performing Arts Centre
  • MARCH 11th London, Royal Geographical Society
  • MARCH 24th Galway, Town Hall Theatre
  • MARCH 25th Dún Laoghaire, Pavilion Theatre
  • MARCH 26th Westport, Town Hall
  • APRIL 1st Hertford, Hertford Theatre
  • APRIL 8th Wimborne, Tivoli Theatre
  • APRIL 10th Glasgow, Eastwood Park Theatre
  • APRIL 11th Pitlochry, Festival Theatre
  • APRIL 16th Basingstoke, The Haymarket
  • APRIL 17th Letchworth, Broadway Theatre
  • APRIL 24th Monmouth, Blake Theatre
  • APRIL 29th Exeter, Northcott Theatre
  • APRIL 30th Northwich, Memorial Court
  • MAY 1st Settle, Settle Victoria Hall
  • MAY 2nd Burnley, Mechanics
  • MAY 3rd Northallerton, The Forum


Wilderland Wildlife Film Festival - UK & IRELAND Spring Tour - 2020

To find out more and to buy tickets, head to: wilderlandfestival.com/tickets

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2020 IWFF FILMS ARE SELECTED!
24th February 2020

Films have been viewed, our community judges have weighed in, and our jury has selected the 2020 films that lit up the screen. Out of a field of 270 films from 30 countries, the Official IWFF Selections are now live on our site! During the fest, our final jury will watch all semi-finalists and present one winner in each category. We're so fired up to share this year's beautiful and important films.

See the full list of official selections:

Animal Behavior

Borneo – Earth´s Ancient Eden
Dancing with the Birds – by Silverback Films
Going Nuts – Tales from the Squirrel World – by Altay Film

Children's

Gajah Borneo
NATURE: Octopus: Making Contact
Rocky Intertidal Zones

Feature

The Kingdom
Tigerland
Watson

Living With Wildlife

Nigerians Fight to Protect the World’s Most Trafficked Mammal
Overland

Voices of the Pacific Flyway

New Vision

Chungungo: A Mentor’s Tale – produced by René Araneda
Dive with a Giant Pacific Octopus & Wolf Eel in 3D 360
Lost Cities

Short

African Drivers “Lion Lights story”
From Kurils With Love
The Love Bugs

Short Short

Detroit Hives
See Animals
Spawning Hope

Student

A Walk Through The Land of A Thousand Hills – by Chema Domenech
Capuchin Culture
The Birds of Play

Sustainable Planet

#Naturenow – by Tom Mustill
Our Planet – One Planet
– by Silverback Films
The Story of Plastic

Wildlife Conservation

A Song for Love – An Ape with an App
Bare Existence
Hunting the Helmeted Hornbill

Congrats to all filmmakers on an incredible showing this year!

Visit: wildlifefilms.org/2020program

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Earth Hour 2020 Official Video - ft. "Rock the World" by The Script

Nature is one of our greatest allies against climate change and is vital for our survival, but it is under threat. This #EarthHour, join millions around the world for the biggest environmental movement of 2020, and switch off on 28 March at 8:30pm your local time. Let’s come together this Earth Hour 2020 to #Connect2Earth and raise our voice for a healthy natural world we can all rely on.


Earth Hour 2020 Official Video - ft. "Rock the World" by The Script

Take the first step at: earthhour.org/voice

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From Richard Brock's blog: Don’t blame it on a virus…

Typical, commercial wildlife TV programmes relentlessly tell us about “Deadly Killers of the Amazon” or “shark fury, ruthless predators” (Nat Geo, etc).

Yes, they may be born to hunt and feed. But in the meantime in a wildlife “sea market” in Wuhan, China, wild creatures, for so long reviled and mispresented are getting their “revenge”.

From that place, with its dead, tortured and desperate inmates comes a tiny microscopic “something” that brings the (important to us) world, as we think it, to its knees.

Travel, health, finance, politics and ordinary people are completely devastated. And whose fault is it?

Don’t blame it on a virus, that “deadly killer” or “ruthless predator”.

It turns out to be more successful on its own terms, than we will ever be.

From: brockinitiative.org/dont-blame-it-on-a-virus

Read: Why wild animals are a key ingredient in China’s coronavirus outbreak scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3047238/why-wild-animals-are-key-ingredient-chinas-coronavirus-outbreak

More from Richard: brockinitiative.org/blog


Wildlife Winners & Losers - How to turn Losers into Winners!

Visit: brockinitiative.org/use-these-films-to-help-save-the-planet

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Jackson Wild World Wildlife Day Film Showcase 2020 Finalists Announced
from Jackson Wild
19 February 2020

Wildlife films to animate the “biodiversity super year”

Finalists Announced for World Wildlife Day Film Showcase

Judges and organizers of the World Wildlife Day 2020 Film Showcase have unveiled the finalists of this year’s contest, highlighting 57 outstanding films, picked from a total of 345 entries. The seven final laureates will be announced on 3 March, during the World Wildlife Day celebrations at a high-level event at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

The festival was organized by Jackson Wild, the Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), along with film professionals. It was announced last November and is the fifth of its kind.

The Showcase is anchored in the theme of this year’s World Wildlife Day: "Sustaining all life on Earth," which aims to celebrate wild fauna and flora as essential components of the world’s biodiversity, to highlight their immense benefits to humanity as purveyor of resources and livelihoods, and to raise awareness about the threats they currently face.

The theme also underlines the importance of sustainable use of biodiversity, as research continues to shed light on the scale and speed of the biodiversity loss crisis the world is facing, and the role that overexploitation of wildlife and the degradation of habitats and ecosystems play in accelerating it.

The judges – professional filmmakers, biodiversity experts and stakeholders from around the world – selected the finalists in eight categories:

  • Science, Innovation and Exploration;
  • Issues and Solutions;
  • People and Wild Species;
  • Stories of Hope;
  • Global Voices;
  • Web of Life; Short; and
  • Micro.

The full list of finalists can be found below.

Winners and finalists will be showcased extensively at events across the world to raise awareness of the importance of conserving and sustainably using the world’s biodiversity and wildlife and maintaining their habitats and ecosystems that benefit all humankind. They will also be part of the messaging around what has been dubbed the ‘biodiversity super year’, at the numerous high-level events organized in 2020 by UN Member States, UN system organizations, multilateral environmental agreements and civil society. The aim is to bring biodiversity and the challenges of halting its loss to the forefront of the sustainable development agenda by adopting an ambitious and transformative global biodiversity framework in line with the Agenda 2030 decade for action.

CITES Secretary-General Ivonne Higuero said: "We are grateful to all filmmakers who submitted their entries celebrating all life on Earth and the great value of our world’s wildlife. The stories and images they recorded will be powerful tools to help raise awareness of the grave crisis that is biodiversity loss. With nearly a million species currently threatened with extinction in the near future because of unsustainable human activity, it is time for us to reshape our relationship with nature, including wild plants and animals. For this year’s World Wildlife Day celebrations, we want to push for a more sustainable use of all the precious and – though we sometimes forget it – limited components of the biosphere. These wonderful films will help us do just that."

"Global biodiversity is declining faster than at any time in human history, with one million plant and animal species currently threatened with extinction. 2020 is a critical year for transformative change to lay the groundwork for a decade of nature conservation and restoration.

The World Wildlife Day 2020 Film Showcase will inspire action by capturing real stories about the irreplaceable benefits that nature provides to support human well-being," said Susan Gardner, Director for Ecosystems for the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

"This year’s selection of finalists are some of the most moving and powerful pieces of media we have ever seen," said Lisa Samford, Executive Director of Jackson Wild. "These films are sure to move the dial for conservation of our planet’s biodiversity."

"The World Wildlife Day 2020 Film Showcase serves as a wonderful way to highlight the importance of sustaining all life on Earth," said Elizabeth Maruma Mrema, Acting Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). "As governments prepare to negotiate the post-2020 global biodiversity framework, increasing the sustainability of wildlife use and management is a priority.We know the stakes are high. We must strive to conserve and use biodiversity sustainably to ensure wildlife keeps sustaining all life. The awareness raised by these films will no doubt serve to enlighten many people about the critical importance of bending the curve on biodiversity loss."

World Wildlife Day 2020 Film Showcase finalists:

Science, Innovation and Exploration:

A Song for Love - An Ape with an App
A co-production of Terra Mater Factual Studios, Mark Fletcher Productions and Colorful Nature Films.

Nature: The Serengeti Rules
A Production of HHMI Tangled Bank Studios and Passion Planet in association with Sandbox Films, Thirteen Productions Llc and WNET

Serengeti: Nature’s Living Laboratory
Day's Edge Productions for Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Issues and Solutions:

Gorillas of Gabon
Earth Touch, Smithsonian Networks

Our Gorongosa
A Gorongosa Media and HHMI Tangled Bank Studios Production

Watson
Local Hero, Participant Media, Terra Mater Factual Studios

People and Wild Species:

Grasslands - North America´s Hidden Wilderness
A River Road Films production in association with CBC and Terra Mater Factual Studios

Kingdom of the White Wolf: Episode 103
Nat Geo Wild

Sharkwater Extinction
Sharkwater Pictures

The Serengeti Rules
HHMI Tangled Bank Studios/Passion Planet

Stories of Hope:

Europe's New Wild: Episode 103
Nat Geo Wild

Rare: Creatures of the Photo Ark: Episode 1
WGBH Boston and So World Media, LLC in association with National Geographic Channels

Silent Forests
House Tiger Productions

Global Voices:

Mundiya Kepanga, The Voice of the Forest
Muriel Barra/ LatoSensu productions

Okavango - River of Dreams - Episode 1: Paradise
A Terra Mater Factual Studios / Wildlife Films production in co-production with Thirteen Productions LLC, Doclights/NDR Naturfilm in association with PBS, CPB, Arte France / Unité Découverte et Connaissance, National Geographic Channels and SVT

On the Front Line, The Rangers of Gorongosa National Park
Gorongosa Media

Queen without Land
Artic Light in association with NRK, NDR/Doclights, ORF, France 3, Smithsonian Channel, SVT

Web of Life:

Borneo - Earth´s Ancient Eden
A production of Terra Mater Factual Studios

Epic Animal Migrations: Mexico
Earth Touch, Smithsonian Channel

Lost Kings of Bioko
Gulo Film Productions for NDR Naturfilm / Doclights, NDR, WDR, ARTE, ORF, Smithsonian Channel, SVT

The Elephant Queen
An Apple Original and A Deeble, Stone and Oliff Production

The Sanctuary: Survival Stories of the Alps
Boreales / Winds, France Televisions, Terra Mater

Short (under 15 minutes):

How to Save Our Planet
Silverback Films

Hunting the Helmeted Hornbill
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Geographic Magazine and Rangkong Indonesia

Nigerians Fight to Protect the World's Most Trafficked Mammal
Coral and Oak Studios, National Geographic

Last Wild Places: Gorongosa
National Geographic Society

MY 25: The Ocean Between Us
Inka Cresswell, University of the West of England - MA Wildlife Filmmaking

(Re)Connecting Wild - Restoring Safe Passage
NineCaribou Productions, LLC

Micro (under 5 minutes):

Breathe
Pioneer Studios

How to Raise Baby Corals
Exposure Labs, bioGraphic

#NatureNow
A @tommustill Film for Gripping Films

Ocean Farmer
Silverback Films

The Story of Cabo Pulmo
Silverback Films

Uncle Elephant
Wild Earth Allies and Emic Films

What is Biodiversity?
Silverback Films

Honorable Mentions, General:

Tree Climbing Lions
Nat Geo Wild

Okavango - River of Dreams - Episode 3: Inferno
A Terra Mater Factual Studios / Wildlife Films production in co-production with Thirteen Productions LLC, Doclights/NDR Naturfilm in association with PBS, CPB, Arte France / Unité Découverte et Connaissance, National Geographic Channels and SVT

Fantastic Fungi
Moving Art, Artemis Rising, Diamond Docs

Walking Thunder
Last Stand Films

Tigerland
Produced for Discovery by RadicalMedia

Gerdab
Wildlife Pictures Institute

Honorable Mentions, Short:

Beyond The Fence
Tessa Barlin in association with the Nature, Environment & Wildlife Filmmakers Congress (NEWF)

Sounds of Survival
Katie Garrett, bioGraphic

1 MILLION Species Could Go Extinct... Here’s Why. | It’s Okay to Be Smart
Spotzen, PBS Digital Studios

The Flying Gold of Arabuko
John Davies, National Film and Television School

Mexico City and its Sacred Salamanders
Katie Garrett, bioGraphic

The Firefox Guardian
Gunjan Menon, University of the West of England

Mud, Sweat, and Fears: Episode 2 of 'Last Call for the Bayou'
Encompass Films

Where Life Begins
Coral and Oak Studios, The Wilderness Society

Honorable Mentions, Short:

Ay Santa Ana
Pongo Media

Gajah Borneo
Shervin Hess, Oregon Zoo

Meet The Real Wolf
Grizzly Creek Films

Spider Monkey for Sale
An Ateles Films production by Michael Sanderson and Ana Luísa Santos

A Constituency for Conservation | Ndoki at 25
Wildlife Conservation Society

Second Chances
Eilidh Munro

The Birdman of Chorao
Shashank Bhosale

The Burrowers
Yasmine Ellis

This sites' producer, Jason Peters, was a Preliminary Judge of this comptetion.

Winners will be presented at a high-level event to coincide with the global celebration of UN World Wildlife Day at UN Headquarters in New York on 3 March 2020.

Winning and finalist films will be subsequently showcased extensively throughout the world, through World Wildlife Day screening events as well as at the Jackson Wild Summit and through Jackson Wild On Tour.


World Wildlife Day 2020 Film Showcase

Visit: jacksonwild.org/biodiversity-finalists.html


World Wildlife Day 2020 - Sustaining all life on Earth

See the full feature here...

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How can environmental films make an impact?

With public interest in environmental issues higher than it has been for years, it is important to maintain the momentum and build on people’s understanding and motivation to protect our natural world. Nina Seale explores how environmental films have been used to engage people to make a difference for the environment.

On the deck of a beautiful French ship, sailors are sitting completely still, watching a swallow resting on the planks.

This is the memorable closing shot from a short film called Le tombeau des épuisés (Tomb of the exhausted), surprise winner of the Audience Favourite at the Good Natured Film Festival. With its slow pace, hushed French narration and subtle music, it didn’t feel like a typical conservation film. However, its power lay in its ability to remind the audience of their own experiences; the connections we create with nature, no matter where we are.


[Court-métrage] Le tombeau des épuisés

When was the last time you were moved by a film or documentary? Can you think of any which have made you reconsider your beliefs, or change your behaviour? What about environment films- when you think of an impactful environment film, what do you think of? Why do you think it made an impact? What is impact?

So… what is impact?

One answer would be change- a beautiful, moving film is distributed to a wide and diverse audience who will duly be inspired and care enough about the cause to take action.

But impact is complicated to plan, predict and measure. A film’s purpose could be to bring an unknown issue to the global spotlight, in which case reach and public sympathy would count as effective impact (e.g. Virunga shedding light on the threats of war, poaching and oil exploration on the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Virunga National Park). But if a film is re-addressing a well-known issue, the impact would be further along the chain: looking at creating systems change (e.g. Blue Planet II inspiring viewers to move away from single-use plastics).

So, when creating their story and impact plan, filmmakers need to truly understand what what change would look like, who would implement it, and how, in order to make a film that will really make a difference.

The right audience

An important part of this is audience. Is the film aiming for widespread behaviour change (a larger, more diverse audience) or specific actions such as policy change or changing the practices of an industry? Will the film reach the right people, or is the film asking the audience to put pressure on decision-makers?

Read more: synchronicityearth.org/how-can-environmental-films-make-an-impact

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Wildlife Film Festival Rotterdam '20 Call For Entry
5th February 2020

Showing your film to the Dutch audience? Last year Wildlife Film Festival Rotterdam welcomed more than 10,000 visitors and is growing ever since we started back in 2015.

We are open for entries until 1 May 2020.
The festival will be held from 27 October - 1 November 2020.
The competition is free of fees and selected filmmakers receive hotel lodging during the festival days (for two people) and free admission to all festival related events and films.

In 2020 Wildlife Film Festival Rotterdam will recognise outstanding achievements in 10 Flamingo Award categories. Your entry will automatically compete for either Best Film/Best Short Film and the Audience Award.

Entry categories:

  • Green Impact
  • Animal Behaviour
  • Awareness
  • Van Lawick Conservation
  • People & Nature
  • Children's
  • Newcomer

You can submit your film via FilmFreeway.

The rules and terms can be found on FilmFreeway.

If you wish to submit your film otherwise, please contact competition@wffr.nl for the possibilities.

Need inspiring? Watch this:


Wildlife Film Festival Rotterdam (WFFR) After-Movie 2019

Website: www.wffr.nl

See the full feature here...

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New Wildeye Wildlife Filmmaking Course

Bespoke camera training

Suitable for those with little to no experience our one day technical course will get you up to speed with all of your cameras manual functions.

Whether you are looking at a career in filmmaking, going travelling or are just a keen amateur looking to up your game this single day one on one course will educate, inspire and give you the skills you need to get the best from your equipment.

This course is run in the beautiful Norfolk countryside and is taught exclusively by our technical tutor Simon Beer. Working with video cameras for 27 years Simon will share his experience, knowledge, offer tips and will explain and demonstrate the core concepts of filmmaking leaving you confident to use a video camera.

Hands-on and field based

Our day begins at Wildeye HQ (with a cup of tea and homemade cake). We start by explaining how cameras work, we will discuss functions including focus, iris, shutter, white balance, gain, ND filters, peaking, scopes, zebras and more to ensure you are familiar with these fundamentals.

Travelling some 20 minutes away we will continue the day at stunning Pensthorpe, previously home to BBC Springwatch. Here we will set-up a number of shots giving you the opportunity to shoot some footage and also demonstrate how by using the cameras on screen tools you can ensure your video is in focus and properly exposed.

We pride ourselves on taking whatever time is necessary with you to ensure you leave us feeling confident and empowered to use a professional video camera whilst understanding the important basics of its operation.

By working together you will gain hands-on experience of how camera operators work and get the amazing shots you see on wildlife, travel and adventure documentaries.

Let's talk tech...

Throughout this fun and knowledge packed day you will get the opportunity to ask any technical questions you want about all sorts of filmmaking kit including cameras, tripods, lighting, audio, gimbals, sliders and more, we’ll also let you have the keys to the Wildeye kit room so you can chose what equipment you want to use throughout the day!

Learn more and book here: wildeye.co.uk/course/wildlife-camera-operator

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Chris Packham - BAFTA Television Lecture

Award-winning broadcaster, conservationist, photographer and writer Chris Packham called on the television industry to make environmental productions carbon neutral within three years, to reduce television production’s impact on climate change and help highlight the truth about environmental problems our planet faces during the BAFTA television lecture at London’s Barbican Centre.

Over the course of his career, Packham has presented many acclaimed and popular natural history programmes, including The Really Wild Show, Springwatch and most recently 7.7 Billion People and Counting. His career has been dedicated to wildlife filmmaking, conservation and educating the public about the environment, and he has been awarded the Dilys Breese BTO Medal for “his outstanding work in promoting science to new audiences” and Wildscreen Panda Award.

Opening his lecture with a powerful dystopian story to demonstrate how climate change could shape our future, Packham then delivered a video message filmed on location in Tanzania discussing the television industry’s role in climate change.


BAFTA TV Lecture: Chris Packham | On Factual

A video from Tanzania that Chris Packham showed at his TV Lecture where he discusses the climate emergency and the role television, alongside Albert, can play in making those changes.

Read more: bafta.org/television/features/chris-packham-bafta-television-lecture

ALBERT says "Right then, we've got 10 years to save the planet - let's get cracking!"

With only 10 years to save the world, albert is stepping up a gear this year.

From events and campaigns to case studies and training - we want to make some noise and make sure everyone in our industry is armed with the knowledge and tools to do their bit.

Find out how to get started at www.wearealbert.org and join the planet party.

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David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet

In his 93 years, David Attenborough has visited every continent on the globe, exploring the wild places of our planet and documenting the living world in all its variety and wonder. Now, for the first time he reflects upon both the defining moments of his lifetime as a naturalist and the devastating changes he has seen.

Produced by WWF and award-winning wildlife film-makers Silverback Films, David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet is a first-hand account of humanity’s impact on nature and a message of hope for future generations.


David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet | Official Trailer

Coming to cinemas across the UK, Netherlands, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Australia and New Zealand on 16 April 2020. Tickets available now at: www.attenborough.film

David Attenborough warns that humans have 'overrun the world'

In a new film, A Life on Our Planet, the broadcaster rails against the imminent, man-made dangers behind the climate emergency.

David Attenborough has warned that humans have “overrun the world” in a trailer for A Life on Our Planet, a forthcoming documentary looking at the changes on Earth during his lifetime. The 93-year-old naturalist and broadcaster describes the project as a “witness statement” of the effects of the climate crisis, adding that the actions of humanity are sending the planet into decline.

More: theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2020/jan/15/david-attenborough-warns-that-humans-have-overrun-the-world

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Are we ignoring warnings on climate change?

Our oceans are heating up, and fast. Sea temperatures in 2019 were the highest on record. Oceans are the clearest measure of climate change, since they absorb 90 per cent of the world's heat. Warmer seas mean more intense storms, droughts, floods and wildfires. The study is the latest warning on the climate crisis facing our planet. However, greenhouse gas emissions are still at record levels. Are we starting to tune out to the constant stream of bad news on the climate? If so, how should we change the conversation? Presenter: Martine Dennis


Are we ignoring warnings on climate change? | Inside Story

As Australia's ruinous wildfires continue to spread, so does disinformation. There has been fake news, conspiracy theories on social media, and even claims the fires were the work of 200 arsonists. A significant amount of this content went viral, sowing confusion and discord in an already rattled population. While much of this has been the work of trolls, mainstream media outlets such as Rupert Murdoch’s Sky News and The Australian newspaper have also been criticised for their coverage. The debate is particularly contentious in a country where climate change has long been a controversial topic that often figures as an election issue. In this show, we will hear the latest news from the epicenter of the disaster, dig into the disinformation campaigns and media controversy, and look at how indigenous people are responding to the devastation.


Why are people lying about Australia's bushfires? | The Stream

Subscribe: youtube.com/user/aljazeeraEnglish

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BBC Two announces Tigers: Hunting The Traffickers, an investigation into illegal tiger farms in South East Asia
By BBC
10th January 2020

Later this year BBC Two will screen Tigers: Hunting The Traffickers, a one-hour documentary from Grain Media in which former Royal Marines Commando Aldo Kane exposes the shocking secrets of the illegal tiger trade in South East Asia and those who profit.

It’s estimated 96% of the world’s wild tigers have disappeared since the turn of the 20th century. With fewer than 4,000 tigers left in the wild, Tigers: Hunting The Traffickers also highlights the plight of a majestic species on the brink of extinction. It explores how tiger farms continue to drive consumer demand for tiger products perpetuating the illegal trade and fuelling poaching.

There are up to 8,000 tigers held in captive facilities across China, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. Captive tigers are often bred and trafficked to meet demand for illegal products like tiger-bone wine and tiger bone glue, which are believed to have medicinal values in parts of Asia, mainly in China and Vietnam.

Working alongside fearless wildlife crime investigators and covertly filming tiger traffickers, Aldo embarks on a perilous journey along key trafficking routes connecting Malaysia, China, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam. From tiger wine breweries in China, to small backyard holdings in Vietnam, the programme uncovers shocking evidence of demand for tiger parts that threatens to wipe out wild tigers entirely. Evidence includes footage of frozen tiger cubs in freezers at a breeding facility in Laos; tigers held in high security holding pens in Thai zoos; a trader openly selling tiger products in Laos with a street value higher than cocaine; and caged tigers fattened in a dark basement in Vietnam to be killed and cooked to order.

Armed with the secret filmed evidence from the investigation Aldo travels to Geneva where it is presented to international decision-makers at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to act on.

Aldo’s fascination for wild tigers and conservation started during his military training in the South East Asia jungles, home to a declining number of wild tigers. In recent years he has also used his specialist military skills to train anti-poaching units in Africa.

Aldo Kane says: “I have spent years in the fight against wildlife poachers and this has given me an unique insight into a criminal underworld, where wild animals are worth more dead than alive. Nothing could have prepared me for what I uncovered about the illegal tiger trade in South East Asia. Here tiger trafficking is big business, often controlled by organised crime units, and yields huge profits. It’s ruthless and cruel and wild tigers pay the ultimate price. The growth of illegal tiger farms across South East Asia is threatening the survival of one of nature’s most beautiful creatures, where a premium is paid for its wild provenance. I hope this film raises awareness of the complex issues that surround the trade and the threat it poses to endangered wild tigers mainly amongst those who ultimately have the power to stop the trade and protect them.”

Patrick Holland, Controller, BBC Two, says: “This is a powerful and urgent film revealing the shocking scale and devastating consequences of the trade in captive tigers. Aldo and the team have shown remarkable bravery and tenacity to reveal the depths of the issue. It is an imperative part of BBC Two’s mission to bring such compelling filmmaking about the changing planet to the broadest audience.”

Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers, a 1x60’ for BBC Two, is made by Grain Media. The executive producer at Grain Media is Monica Garnsey and the executive producer at the BBC is Roger Webb. Laura Warner is the director. It was commissioned by Patrick Holland, Controller, BBC Two, and the Commissioning Editor is Tom Coveney.


Tigers: Hunting The Traffickers

From: bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2020/tigers

See the full feature here...

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Wildscreen evolves Panda Awards and introduces Official Selection for 2020
By Wildscreen
9th January 2020

Wildscreen, creators of the world’s largest and most prestigious wildlife film and photo Festival today announces the launch of the newly revamped Panda Awards, the highest honour in the global wildlife and environmental film industry. The 2020 Wildscreen Festival will also feature an Official Selection screening programme and a bold new award to recognise best practice in sustainable production.

David Allen, multi award-winning filmmaker, is also announced as Final Jury Chair.

Wildscreen Panda Awards

The wildlife industry takes global audiences to the world’s most remote, inhospitable and threatened environments, shining a spotlight on species and habitats that most will not experience. This form of documentary has never been more important or needed, with biodiversity being threatened to the point of no return. The Panda Awards celebrates the human endeavour, commitment and unique skill that it takes to tell nature’s stories. As this industry thrives, the demand for the content our industry creates has never been greater.

In 2020, the Wildscreen Panda Awards will focus on the craft and impact on audiences. The eleven categories in the 2020 Panda Award competition are: Cinematography, Editing, Emerging Talent (film and photo) Music, Photo Story, Producer/Director, Production Team, Scripted Narrative, Series and Sound.

The 2020 competition sees the introduction of two new awards recognising the talent of individuals and teams: the Producer/Director award and the Production Team award recognising the collaborative nature of the genre and the remarkable endeavour of the entire team, from pre to post production.

All films nominated across the eleven categories will be eligible for the Golden Panda Award, selected by the Final Jury.

New for 2020, the Sustainable Panda Award will recognise the production that best uses sustainable practices to reduce the environmental damage across the entirety of a production. Each production entered in to the awards will need to outline the measures taken in their submission.

David Allen, head of Passion Planet, is also announced as Chair of the 2020 Wildscreen Panda Award Final Jury. David is no stranger to the awards having won no less than seven Pandas, including the 2018 Theatrical Panda Award for The Serengeti Rules and the Golden Panda Award, for My Life as a Turkey in 2014 is announced as the Chair of the 2020 Wildscreen Panda Award Final Jury.

David Allen said: “In 1989 I had a short film selected for the ‘Newcomer Panda Award’, I didn’t win, but I have been attending the Wildscreen Festival ever since. Thirty years later, it's a true honour to be asked to Chair Final Jury for the 2020 Wildscreen Panda Awards. The Pandas are truly regarded as the highest accolade in our genre, and at this particularly important time for both our industry and our planet, I can’t wait to see this year’s entries.”

Wildscreen Festival Official Selection – New for 2020

As we enter a new decade, we are at a time in our history when stories about the natural world have never been more important - we are the first generation to understand humanity’s impact on nature and the last to be able to protect and restore it. Wildscreen believes in the power of visual storytelling to spark positive and restorative action for our natural world, globally. Bold, authentic and varied stories that speak to different audiences with urgency and hope have never been so necessary.

The inaugural Wildscreen Official Selection will be a global launch pad where creative innovation is recognised, new voices are discovered and where there is equality in opportunity from which a truly inclusive natural world storytelling genre evolves.

The Official Selection is open to anyone with a story about nature to share. Entrants will be able to submit long or short form content, including emerging technologies or platforms. A team of programmers will curate a screening programme featuring original and creative stories about the natural world. The natural world is beautifully diverse and this strength will be reflected through the voices heard, tools used and stories shared within the Wildscreen Official Selection. The programme will consist of premieres, global voices and brave innovations.

The 2020 edition of the industry Festival takes place 19-23 October 2020 in Bristol, UK. The Official Selection screening programme will take place between 17-25 October and be open to both industry and public audiences.

To enter the Wildscreen Panda Awards or Official Selection, visit the Festival’s website.

See the full feature here!

See: Wildscreen Panda Awards 2018 Winners Announced!

Follow etc: facebook.com/wildscreenfest & twitter.com/WildscreenFest + instagram.com/wildscreenorg

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From Richard Brock's blog:
PLANET CRUNCH © – BOOK/FILM
6 January 2020

“Planet Crunch” One year in the Life (or Death) of a Planet. Ours. The only one we’ve got. The Earth."

"In the autumn of 2019 a 16 year old Swedish schoolgirl came to England and there, supported by millions of people around the world, told us how it was, is and may become. Her name is Greta Thunberg. We will follow her already-famous progress across one year to major, crucial, pivotal conferences in China about global biodiversity; in Glasgow in Scotland about climate change worldwide and the famous international wildlife film festival “Wildscreen” in Bristol, England. These three major events are the culmination of Greta Thunberg’s and Sir David Attenborough’s efforts to save the planet. Or not. No less. The Crunch has arrived. And it now affects almost every aspect of our lives, wherever we are, whoever we are. Our story connects biodiversity; places; forests; farming; fishing; food; fashion; consumerism; waste; human populations; politics; big money/corporations; water (air–› glaciers–›rivers–› sea); plastics; energy; tourism; media; transport: the future; China – its impact on everything – it’s already in the room. The content and order may change.

I expect the book/film will be in about 20 book chapters/film sections. Book: 6 pages each chapter, total about 120+ pages – Film: 2 mins each section = about 40+ mins. They will be very available before, at, and after the three major events mentioned above. Ready by October 2020, and, hopefully, with great education potential for schools, and anyone, anywhere else…Forget Brexit! It’s comparatively unimportant." Richard via brockinitiative.org/planet-crunch-book-film

Visit Brock's Blog! brockinitiative.org/blog

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Prince William unveils 'Earthshot prize' to tackle climate crisis

Move is hailed by Sir David Attenborough as ‘the most prestigious environment prize in history’

Prince William has announced what was described as “the most prestigious environment prize in history” to encourage new solutions to tackling the climate crisis. The “Earthshot prize” will be awarded to five people every year over the next decade, the Prince said on Tuesday, and aims to provide at least 50 answers to some of the greatest problems facing the planet by 2030. They include promoting new ways of addressing issues such as energy, nature and biodiversity, the oceans, air pollution and fresh water. The prize, inspired by US president John F Kennedy’s ambitious “Moonshot” lunar programme and backed by Sir David Attenborough, promises “a significant financial award”, a statement said. The Duke of Cambridge, a grandson of the Queen and second in line to the throne, said the Earth was “at a tipping point” and faced a “stark choice”.“Either we continue as we are and irreparably damage our planet or we remember our unique power as human beings and our continual ability to lead, innovate and problem-solve,” he said. “Remember the awe-inspiring civilisations that we have built, the life-saving technology we have created, the fact that we have put a man on the moon. People can achieve great things. “The next 10 years present us with one of our greatest tests – a decade of action to repair the Earth,” he said.

Read more: theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/jan/01/prince-william-unveils-earthshot-prize-to-tackle-climate-crisis


The Earthshot Prize

Over the last ten years, the evidence that we face urgent challenges to protect the environment has become indisputable, and it’s clear that the time to act is now. Drawing inspiration from the concept of moonshots, which since the moon landing in 1969 has become shorthand to talk about the most ambitious and ground-breaking goals, Prince William announces the Earthshot Prize: an ambitious set of challenges to inspire a decade of action to repair the planet.

The Earthshot Launch film was made for the Royal Foundation by HTYT Films with thanks to:
• Silverback Films • Getty Images • Sky • Our Planet • Druyan-Sagan Associates • Google • BBC Earth • North Design • Nic Woinilowicz • String and Tins • Moving Picture Company

Visit: earthshotprize.org, facebook.com/earthshotprize, instagram.com/earthshotprize & twitter.com/earthshotprize

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Two New films from the Brock Initiative

1) Seven Worlds One Water Mill

The Mill, its pool and the surrounding landscape in Dorset provide a microcosm of the English countryside now - from when it was built and used to provide power and food up to today, still milling after 1000 years.

Seven small worlds reveal glimpses of a surprisingly rich community. Welcome to those wonderful worlds featuring swallows, very cute harvest mice, ospreys, otters, kingfishers, swans,snakes, frogs and water - walkers.


Seven Worlds One Water Mill

2) The Humble Bumblebee - Why it's Amazing!

A familiar sight in an English country garden - or even a window box. Their private life is truly extraordinary and to reveal it we follow bumblebees on their rounds as they visit many flowers for pollen and nectar.

The Queen takes great care of her young, but if we don't take care of bees and insects as a whole, we may face disaster worldwide.

Farming is a crucial ingredient in this story.


The Humble Bumblebee - Why it's Amazing!

Filmed & Produced by Richard Brock, Aerials by Ross Birnie & Edited by Gareth Trezise

Visit: brockinitiative.org/use-these-films-to-help-save-the-planet

The Vegan Cook & Gardener

The Green Hub Project

Brock Initiative

British Wildlife Photography Awards

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Conservation Film-making - How to make films that make a difference

Wildlife Film-making: Looking to the Future

Environmental Investigation Agency

Wildlife-film.com - Wildlife, Natural History, Environmental, Conservation & Vegan Film News and Information

About Wildlife-film.com

Since the late 1990s Wildlife-film.com has been the leading source of information for the wildlife filmmaking industry worldwide. For over twenty years the site has been Google's number one ranking site for 'wildlife film' and related searches. Our site is viewed in over 195 countries. Our newsletter, Wildlife Film News, is read every month by thousands of people involved in wildlife filmmaking - from broadcasters and producers, to cameramen - we encourage readers to submit their news. We also serve as an online resource for industry professionals and services. Find producers, editors, presenters and more in our Freelancer section, and find out about festivals, training and conservation in Organisations. We encourage amateur and professional freelancers to join our network and welcome all wildlife-film related organisations to join our team.


 


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